Prevent a MITM from forcing a NULL cipher for UDP (CVE-2018-16758)
[oweals/tinc.git] / doc / tinc.texi
1 \input texinfo   @c -*-texinfo-*-
2 @c %**start of header
3 @setfilename tinc.info
4 @settitle tinc Manual
5 @setchapternewpage odd
6 @c %**end of header
7
8 @include tincinclude.texi
9
10 @ifinfo
11 @dircategory Networking tools
12 @direntry
13 * tinc: (tinc).              The tinc Manual.
14 @end direntry
15
16 This is the info manual for @value{PACKAGE} version @value{VERSION}, a Virtual Private Network daemon.
17
18 Copyright @copyright{} 1998-2018 Ivo Timmermans,
19 Guus Sliepen <guus@@tinc-vpn.org> and
20 Wessel Dankers <wsl@@tinc-vpn.org>.
21
22 Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of this
23 manual provided the copyright notice and this permission notice are
24 preserved on all copies.
25
26 Permission is granted to copy and distribute modified versions of this
27 manual under the conditions for verbatim copying, provided that the
28 entire resulting derived work is distributed under the terms of a
29 permission notice identical to this one.
30
31 @end ifinfo
32
33 @titlepage
34 @title tinc Manual
35 @subtitle Setting up a Virtual Private Network with tinc
36 @author Ivo Timmermans and Guus Sliepen
37
38 @page
39 @vskip 0pt plus 1filll
40 This is the info manual for @value{PACKAGE} version @value{VERSION}, a Virtual Private Network daemon.
41
42 Copyright @copyright{} 1998-2018 Ivo Timmermans,
43 Guus Sliepen <guus@@tinc-vpn.org> and
44 Wessel Dankers <wsl@@tinc-vpn.org>.
45
46 Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of this
47 manual provided the copyright notice and this permission notice are
48 preserved on all copies.
49
50 Permission is granted to copy and distribute modified versions of this
51 manual under the conditions for verbatim copying, provided that the
52 entire resulting derived work is distributed under the terms of a
53 permission notice identical to this one.
54
55 @end titlepage
56
57 @ifnottex
58 @c ==================================================================
59 @node Top
60 @top Top
61
62 @menu
63 * Introduction::
64 * Preparations::
65 * Installation::
66 * Configuration::
67 * Running tinc::
68 * Technical information::
69 * Platform specific information::
70 * About us::
71 * Concept Index::               All used terms explained
72 @end menu
73 @end ifnottex
74
75 @c ==================================================================
76 @node    Introduction
77 @chapter Introduction
78
79 @cindex tinc
80 Tinc is a Virtual Private Network (VPN) daemon that uses tunneling and
81 encryption to create a secure private network between hosts on the
82 Internet.
83
84 Because the tunnel appears to the IP level network code as a normal
85 network device, there is no need to adapt any existing software.
86 The encrypted tunnels allows VPN sites to share information with each other
87 over the Internet without exposing any information to others.
88
89 This document is the manual for tinc.  Included are chapters on how to
90 configure your computer to use tinc, as well as the configuration
91 process of tinc itself.
92
93 @menu
94 * Virtual Private Networks::
95 * tinc::                        About tinc
96 * Supported platforms::
97 @end menu
98
99 @c ==================================================================
100 @node    Virtual Private Networks
101 @section Virtual Private Networks
102
103 @cindex VPN
104 A Virtual Private Network or VPN is a network that can only be accessed
105 by a few elected computers that participate.  This goal is achievable in
106 more than just one way.
107
108 @cindex private
109 Private networks can consist of a single stand-alone Ethernet LAN.  Or
110 even two computers hooked up using a null-modem cable.  In these cases,
111 it is
112 obvious that the network is @emph{private}, no one can access it from the
113 outside.  But if your computers are linked to the Internet, the network
114 is not private anymore, unless one uses firewalls to block all private
115 traffic.  But then, there is no way to send private data to trusted
116 computers on the other end of the Internet.
117
118 @cindex virtual
119 This problem can be solved by using @emph{virtual} networks.  Virtual
120 networks can live on top of other networks, but they use encapsulation to
121 keep using their private address space so they do not interfere with
122 the Internet.  Mostly, virtual networks appear like a single LAN, even though
123 they can span the entire world.  But virtual networks can't be secured
124 by using firewalls, because the traffic that flows through it has to go
125 through the Internet, where other people can look at it.
126
127 As is the case with either type of VPN, anybody could eavesdrop.  Or
128 worse, alter data.  Hence it's probably advisable to encrypt the data
129 that flows over the network.
130
131 When one introduces encryption, we can form a true VPN.  Other people may
132 see encrypted traffic, but if they don't know how to decipher it (they
133 need to know the key for that), they cannot read the information that flows
134 through the VPN.  This is what tinc was made for.
135
136
137 @c ==================================================================
138 @node    tinc
139 @section tinc
140
141 @cindex vpnd
142 I really don't quite remember what got us started, but it must have been
143 Guus' idea.  He wrote a simple implementation (about 50 lines of C) that
144 used the ethertap device that Linux knows of since somewhere
145 about kernel 2.1.60.  It didn't work immediately and he improved it a
146 bit.  At this stage, the project was still simply called "vpnd".
147
148 Since then, a lot has changed---to say the least.
149
150 @cindex tincd
151 Tinc now supports encryption, it consists of a single daemon (tincd) for
152 both the receiving and sending end, it has become largely
153 runtime-configurable---in short, it has become a full-fledged
154 professional package.
155
156 @cindex traditional VPNs
157 @cindex scalability
158 Tinc also allows more than two sites to connect to eachother and form a single VPN.
159 Traditionally VPNs are created by making tunnels, which only have two endpoints.
160 Larger VPNs with more sites are created by adding more tunnels.
161 Tinc takes another approach: only endpoints are specified,
162 the software itself will take care of creating the tunnels.
163 This allows for easier configuration and improved scalability.
164
165 A lot can---and will be---changed. We have a number of things that we would like to
166 see in the future releases of tinc.  Not everything will be available in
167 the near future.  Our first objective is to make tinc work perfectly as
168 it stands, and then add more advanced features.
169
170 Meanwhile, we're always open-minded towards new ideas.  And we're
171 available too.
172
173
174 @c ==================================================================
175 @node    Supported platforms
176 @section Supported platforms
177
178 @cindex platforms
179 Tinc has been verified to work under Linux, FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD, Mac OS X (Darwin), Solaris, and Windows (both natively and in a Cygwin environment),
180 with various hardware architectures.  These are some of the platforms
181 that are supported by the universal tun/tap device driver or other virtual network device drivers.
182 Without such a driver, tinc will most
183 likely compile and run, but it will not be able to send or receive data
184 packets.
185
186 @cindex release
187 For an up to date list of supported platforms, please check the list on
188 our website:
189 @uref{https://www.tinc-vpn.org/platforms/}.
190
191 @c
192 @c
193 @c
194 @c
195 @c
196 @c
197 @c       Preparing your system
198 @c
199 @c
200 @c
201 @c
202 @c
203
204 @c ==================================================================
205 @node    Preparations
206 @chapter Preparations
207
208 This chapter contains information on how to prepare your system to
209 support tinc.
210
211 @menu
212 * Configuring the kernel::
213 * Libraries::
214 @end menu
215
216
217 @c ==================================================================
218 @node    Configuring the kernel
219 @section Configuring the kernel
220
221 @menu
222 * Configuration of Linux kernels::
223 * Configuration of FreeBSD kernels::
224 * Configuration of OpenBSD kernels::
225 * Configuration of NetBSD kernels::
226 * Configuration of Solaris kernels::
227 * Configuration of Darwin (Mac OS X) kernels::
228 * Configuration of Windows::
229 @end menu
230
231
232 @c ==================================================================
233 @node       Configuration of Linux kernels
234 @subsection Configuration of Linux kernels
235
236 @cindex Universal tun/tap
237 For tinc to work, you need a kernel that supports the Universal tun/tap device.
238 Most distributions come with kernels that already support this.
239 Here are the options you have to turn on when configuring a new kernel:
240
241 @example
242 Code maturity level options
243 [*] Prompt for development and/or incomplete code/drivers
244 Network device support
245 <M> Universal tun/tap device driver support
246 @end example
247
248 It's not necessary to compile this driver as a module, even if you are going to
249 run more than one instance of tinc.
250
251 If you decide to build the tun/tap driver as a kernel module, add these lines
252 to @file{/etc/modules.conf}:
253
254 @example
255 alias char-major-10-200 tun
256 @end example
257
258
259 @c ==================================================================
260 @node       Configuration of FreeBSD kernels
261 @subsection Configuration of FreeBSD kernels
262
263 For FreeBSD version 4.1 and higher, tun and tap drivers are included in the default kernel configuration.
264 The tap driver can be loaded with @code{kldload if_tap}, or by adding @code{if_tap_load="YES"} to @file{/boot/loader.conf}.
265
266
267 @c ==================================================================
268 @node       Configuration of OpenBSD kernels
269 @subsection Configuration of OpenBSD kernels
270
271 Recent versions of OpenBSD come with both tun and tap devices enabled in the default kernel configuration.
272
273
274 @c ==================================================================
275 @node       Configuration of NetBSD kernels
276 @subsection Configuration of NetBSD kernels
277
278 For NetBSD version 1.5.2 and higher,
279 the tun driver is included in the default kernel configuration.
280
281 Tunneling IPv6 may not work on NetBSD's tun device.
282
283
284 @c ==================================================================
285 @node       Configuration of Solaris kernels
286 @subsection Configuration of Solaris kernels
287
288 For Solaris 8 (SunOS 5.8) and higher,
289 the tun driver may or may not be included in the default kernel configuration.
290 If it isn't, the source can be downloaded from @uref{http://vtun.sourceforge.net/tun/}.
291 For x86 and sparc64 architectures, precompiled versions can be found at @uref{https://www.monkey.org/~dugsong/fragroute/}.
292 If the @file{net/if_tun.h} header file is missing, install it from the source package.
293
294
295 @c ==================================================================
296 @node       Configuration of Darwin (Mac OS X) kernels
297 @subsection Configuration of Darwin (Mac OS X) kernels
298
299 Tinc on Darwin relies on a tunnel driver for its data acquisition from the kernel.
300 OS X version 10.6.8 and later have a built-in tun driver called "utun".
301 Tinc also supports the driver from @uref{http://tuntaposx.sourceforge.net/},
302 which supports both tun and tap style devices.
303
304 By default, tinc expects the tuntaposx driver to be installed.
305 To use the utun driver, set add @code{Device = utunX} to @file{tinc.conf},
306 where X is the desired number for the utun interface.
307 You can also omit the number, in which case the first free number will be chosen.
308
309
310 @c ==================================================================
311 @node       Configuration of Windows
312 @subsection Configuration of Windows
313
314 You will need to install the latest TAP-Win32 driver from OpenVPN.
315 You can download it from @uref{https://openvpn.net/index.php/open-source/downloads.html}.
316 Using the Network Connections control panel,
317 configure the TAP-Win32 network interface in the same way as you would do from the tinc-up script,
318 as explained in the rest of the documentation.
319
320
321 @c ==================================================================
322 @node    Libraries
323 @section Libraries
324
325 @cindex requirements
326 @cindex libraries
327 Before you can configure or build tinc, you need to have the LibreSSL or OpenSSL,
328 zlib and lzo libraries installed on your system.  If you try to configure tinc without
329 having them installed, configure will give you an error message, and stop.
330
331 @menu
332 * LibreSSL/OpenSSL::
333 * zlib::
334 * lzo::
335 @end menu
336
337
338 @c ==================================================================
339 @node       LibreSSL/OpenSSL
340 @subsection LibreSSL/OpenSSL
341
342 @cindex LibreSSL
343 @cindex OpenSSL
344 For all cryptography-related functions, tinc uses the functions provided
345 by the LibreSSL or the OpenSSL library.
346
347 If this library is not installed, you will get an error when configuring
348 tinc for build.  Support for running tinc with other cryptographic libraries
349 installed @emph{may} be added in the future.
350
351 You can use your operating system's package manager to install this if
352 available.  Make sure you install the development AND runtime versions
353 of this package.
354
355 If your operating system comes neither with LibreSSL or OpenSSL, you have to
356 install one manually.  It is recommended that you get the latest version of
357 LibreSSL from @url{http://www.libressl.org/}.  Instructions on how to
358 configure, build and install this package are included within the package.
359 Please make sure you build development and runtime libraries (which is the
360 default).
361
362 If you installed the LibreSSL or OpenSSL libraries from source, it may be necessary
363 to let configure know where they are, by passing configure one of the
364 --with-openssl-* parameters. Note that you even have to use --with-openssl-* if you
365 are using LibreSSL.
366
367 @example
368 --with-openssl=DIR      LibreSSL/OpenSSL library and headers prefix
369 --with-openssl-include=DIR LibreSSL/OpenSSL headers directory
370                         (Default is OPENSSL_DIR/include)
371 --with-openssl-lib=DIR  LibreSSL/OpenSSL library directory
372                         (Default is OPENSSL_DIR/lib)
373 @end example
374
375
376 @subsubheading License
377
378 @cindex license
379 The complete source code of tinc is covered by the GNU GPL version 2.
380 Since the license under which OpenSSL is distributed is not directly
381 compatible with the terms of the GNU GPL
382 @uref{https://www.openssl.org/support/faq.html#LEGAL2}, we
383 include an exemption to the GPL (see also the file COPYING.README) to allow
384 everyone to create a statically or dynamically linked executable:
385
386 @quotation
387 This program is released under the GPL with the additional exemption
388 that compiling, linking, and/or using OpenSSL is allowed.  You may
389 provide binary packages linked to the OpenSSL libraries, provided that
390 all other requirements of the GPL are met.
391 @end quotation
392
393 Since the LZO library used by tinc is also covered by the GPL,
394 we also present the following exemption:
395
396 @quotation
397 Hereby I grant a special exception to the tinc VPN project
398 (https://www.tinc-vpn.org/) to link the LZO library with the OpenSSL library
399 (https://www.openssl.org).
400
401 Markus F.X.J. Oberhumer
402 @end quotation
403
404
405 @c ==================================================================
406 @node       zlib
407 @subsection zlib
408
409 @cindex zlib
410 For the optional compression of UDP packets, tinc uses the functions provided
411 by the zlib library.
412
413 If this library is not installed, you will get an error when running the
414 configure script.  You can either install the zlib library, or disable support
415 for zlib compression by using the "--disable-zlib" option when running the
416 configure script. Note that if you disable support for zlib, the resulting
417 binary will not work correctly on VPNs where zlib compression is used.
418
419 You can use your operating system's package manager to install this if
420 available.  Make sure you install the development AND runtime versions
421 of this package.
422
423 If you have to install zlib manually, you can get the source code
424 from @url{http://www.zlib.net/}.  Instructions on how to configure,
425 build and install this package are included within the package.  Please
426 make sure you build development and runtime libraries (which is the
427 default).
428
429
430 @c ==================================================================
431 @node       lzo
432 @subsection lzo
433
434 @cindex lzo
435 Another form of compression is offered using the LZO library.
436
437 If this library is not installed, you will get an error when running the
438 configure script.  You can either install the LZO library, or disable support
439 for LZO compression by using the "--disable-lzo" option when running the
440 configure script. Note that if you disable support for LZO, the resulting
441 binary will not work correctly on VPNs where LZO compression is used.
442
443 You can use your operating system's package manager to install this if
444 available.  Make sure you install the development AND runtime versions
445 of this package.
446
447 If you have to install lzo manually, you can get the source code
448 from @url{https://www.oberhumer.com/opensource/lzo/}.  Instructions on how to configure,
449 build and install this package are included within the package.  Please
450 make sure you build development and runtime libraries (which is the
451 default).
452
453
454 @c
455 @c
456 @c
457 @c      Installing tinc
458 @c
459 @c
460 @c
461 @c
462
463 @c ==================================================================
464 @node    Installation
465 @chapter Installation
466
467 If you use Debian, you may want to install one of the
468 precompiled packages for your system.  These packages are equipped with
469 system startup scripts and sample configurations.
470
471 If you cannot use one of the precompiled packages, or you want to compile tinc
472 for yourself, you can use the source.  The source is distributed under
473 the GNU General Public License (GPL).  Download the source from the
474 @uref{https://www.tinc-vpn.org/download/, download page}.
475
476 Tinc comes in a convenient autoconf/automake package, which you can just
477 treat the same as any other package.  Which is just untar it, type
478 `./configure' and then `make'.
479 More detailed instructions are in the file @file{INSTALL}, which is
480 included in the source distribution.
481
482 @menu
483 * Building and installing tinc::
484 * System files::
485 @end menu
486
487
488 @c ==================================================================
489 @node    Building and installing tinc
490 @section Building and installing tinc
491
492 Detailed instructions on configuring the source, building tinc and installing tinc
493 can be found in the file called @file{INSTALL}.
494
495 @cindex binary package
496 If you happen to have a binary package for tinc for your distribution,
497 you can use the package management tools of that distribution to install tinc.
498 The documentation that comes along with your distribution will tell you how to do that.
499
500 @menu
501 * Darwin (Mac OS X) build environment::
502 * Cygwin (Windows) build environment::
503 * MinGW (Windows) build environment::
504 @end menu
505
506
507 @c ==================================================================
508 @node       Darwin (Mac OS X) build environment
509 @subsection Darwin (Mac OS X) build environment
510
511 In order to build tinc on Darwin, you need to install Xcode from @uref{https://developer.apple.com/xcode/}.
512 It might also help to install a recent version of Fink from @uref{http://www.finkproject.org/}.
513
514 You need to download and install LibreSSL (or OpenSSL) and LZO,
515 either directly from their websites (see @ref{Libraries}) or using Fink.
516
517 @c ==================================================================
518 @node       Cygwin (Windows) build environment
519 @subsection Cygwin (Windows) build environment
520
521 If Cygwin hasn't already been installed, install it directly from
522 @uref{https://www.cygwin.com/}.
523
524 When tinc is compiled in a Cygwin environment, it can only be run in this environment,
525 but all programs, including those started outside the Cygwin environment, will be able to use the VPN.
526 It will also support all features.
527
528 @c ==================================================================
529 @node       MinGW (Windows) build environment
530 @subsection MinGW (Windows) build environment
531
532 You will need to install the MinGW environment from @uref{http://www.mingw.org}.
533 You also need to download and install LibreSSL (or OpenSSL) and LZO.
534
535 When tinc is compiled using MinGW it runs natively under Windows,
536 it is not necessary to keep MinGW installed.
537
538 When detaching, tinc will install itself as a service,
539 which will be restarted automatically after reboots.
540
541
542 @c ==================================================================
543 @node    System files
544 @section System files
545
546 Before you can run tinc, you must make sure you have all the needed
547 files on your system.
548
549 @menu
550 * Device files::
551 * Other files::
552 @end menu
553
554
555 @c ==================================================================
556 @node       Device files
557 @subsection Device files
558
559 @cindex device files
560 Most operating systems nowadays come with the necessary device files by default,
561 or they have a mechanism to create them on demand.
562
563 If you use Linux and do not have udev installed,
564 you may need to create the following device file if it does not exist:
565
566 @example
567 mknod -m 600 /dev/net/tun c 10 200
568 @end example
569
570
571 @c ==================================================================
572 @node       Other files
573 @subsection Other files
574
575 @subsubheading @file{/etc/networks}
576
577 You may add a line to @file{/etc/networks} so that your VPN will get a
578 symbolic name.  For example:
579
580 @example
581 myvpn 10.0.0.0
582 @end example
583
584 @subsubheading @file{/etc/services}
585
586 @cindex port numbers
587 You may add this line to @file{/etc/services}.  The effect is that you
588 may supply a @samp{tinc} as a valid port number to some programs.  The
589 number 655 is registered with the IANA.
590
591 @example
592 tinc            655/tcp    TINC
593 tinc            655/udp    TINC
594 #                          Ivo Timmermans <ivo@@tinc-vpn.org>
595 @end example
596
597
598 @c
599 @c
600 @c
601 @c
602 @c         Configuring tinc
603 @c
604 @c
605 @c
606 @c
607
608
609 @c ==================================================================
610 @node    Configuration
611 @chapter Configuration
612
613 @menu
614 * Configuration introduction::
615 * Multiple networks::
616 * How connections work::
617 * Configuration files::
618 * Generating keypairs::
619 * Network interfaces::
620 * Example configuration::
621 @end menu
622
623 @c ==================================================================
624 @node    Configuration introduction
625 @section Configuration introduction
626
627 Before actually starting to configure tinc and editing files,
628 make sure you have read this entire section so you know what to expect.
629 Then, make it clear to yourself how you want to organize your VPN:
630 What are the nodes (computers running tinc)?
631 What IP addresses/subnets do they have?
632 What is the network mask of the entire VPN?
633 Do you need special firewall rules?
634 Do you have to set up masquerading or forwarding rules?
635 Do you want to run tinc in router mode or switch mode?
636 These questions can only be answered by yourself,
637 you will not find the answers in this documentation.
638 Make sure you have an adequate understanding of networks in general.
639 @cindex Network Administrators Guide
640 A good resource on networking is the
641 @uref{http://www.tldp.org/LDP/nag2/, Linux Network Administrators Guide}.
642
643 If you have everything clearly pictured in your mind,
644 proceed in the following order:
645 First, generate the configuration files (@file{tinc.conf}, your host configuration file, @file{tinc-up} and perhaps @file{tinc-down}).
646 Then generate the keypairs.
647 Finally, distribute the host configuration files.
648 These steps are described in the subsections below.
649
650
651 @c ==================================================================
652 @node    Multiple networks
653 @section Multiple networks
654
655 @cindex multiple networks
656 @cindex netname
657 In order to allow you to run more than one tinc daemon on one computer,
658 for instance if your computer is part of more than one VPN,
659 you can assign a @var{netname} to your VPN.
660 It is not required if you only run one tinc daemon,
661 it doesn't even have to be the same on all the sites of your VPN,
662 but it is recommended that you choose one anyway.
663
664 We will assume you use a netname throughout this document.
665 This means that you call tincd with the -n argument,
666 which will assign a netname to this daemon.
667
668 The effect of this is that the daemon will set its configuration
669 root to @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/}, where @var{netname} is your argument to the -n
670 option.  You'll notice that it appears in syslog as @file{tinc.@var{netname}}.
671
672 However, it is not strictly necessary that you call tinc with the -n
673 option.  In this case, the network name would just be empty, and it will
674 be used as such.  tinc now looks for files in @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/}, instead of
675 @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/}; the configuration file should be @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/tinc.conf},
676 and the host configuration files are now expected to be in @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/hosts/}.
677
678 But it is highly recommended that you use this feature of tinc, because
679 it will be so much clearer whom your daemon talks to.  Hence, we will
680 assume that you use it.
681
682
683 @c ==================================================================
684 @node    How connections work
685 @section How connections work
686
687 When tinc starts up, it parses the command-line options and then
688 reads in the configuration file tinc.conf.
689 If it sees one or more  `ConnectTo' values pointing to other tinc daemons in that file,
690 it will try to connect to those other daemons.
691 Whether this succeeds or not and whether `ConnectTo' is specified or not,
692 tinc will listen for incoming connection from other daemons.
693 If you did specify a `ConnectTo' value and the other side is not responding,
694 tinc will keep retrying.
695 This means that once started, tinc will stay running until you tell it to stop,
696 and failures to connect to other tinc daemons will not stop your tinc daemon
697 for trying again later.
698 This means you don't have to intervene if there are temporary network problems.
699
700 @cindex client
701 @cindex server
702 There is no real distinction between a server and a client in tinc.
703 If you wish, you can view a tinc daemon without a `ConnectTo' value as a server,
704 and one which does specify such a value as a client.
705 It does not matter if two tinc daemons have a `ConnectTo' value pointing to each other however.
706
707
708 @c ==================================================================
709 @node    Configuration files
710 @section Configuration files
711
712 The actual configuration of the daemon is done in the file
713 @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/tinc.conf} and at least one other file in the directory
714 @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/hosts/}.
715
716 An optional directory @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/conf.d} can be added from which
717 any .conf file will be read.
718
719 These file consists of comments (lines started with a #) or assignments
720 in the form of
721
722 @example
723 Variable = Value.
724 @end example
725
726 The variable names are case insensitive, and any spaces, tabs, newlines
727 and carriage returns are ignored.  Note: it is not required that you put
728 in the `=' sign, but doing so improves readability.  If you leave it
729 out, remember to replace it with at least one space character.
730
731 The server configuration is complemented with host specific configuration (see
732 the next section). Although all host configuration options for the local node
733 listed in this document can also be put in
734 @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/tinc.conf}, it is recommended to
735 put host specific configuration options in the host configuration file, as this
736 makes it easy to exchange with other nodes.
737
738 In this section all valid variables are listed in alphabetical order.
739 The default value is given between parentheses,
740 other comments are between square brackets.
741
742 @menu
743 * Main configuration variables::
744 * Host configuration variables::
745 * Scripts::
746 * How to configure::
747 @end menu
748
749
750 @c ==================================================================
751 @node       Main configuration variables
752 @subsection Main configuration variables
753
754 @table @asis
755 @cindex AddressFamily
756 @item AddressFamily = <ipv4|ipv6|any> (any)
757 This option affects the address family of listening and outgoing sockets.
758 If any is selected, then depending on the operating system
759 both IPv4 and IPv6 or just IPv6 listening sockets will be created.
760
761 @cindex BindToAddress
762 @item BindToAddress = <@var{address}> [<@var{port}>] [experimental]
763 If your computer has more than one IPv4 or IPv6 address, tinc
764 will by default listen on all of them for incoming connections.
765 Multiple BindToAddress variables may be specified,
766 in which case listening sockets for each specified address are made.
767
768 If no @var{port} is specified, the socket will be bound to the port specified by the Port option,
769 or to port 655 if neither is given.
770 To only bind to a specific port but not to a specific address, use "*" for the @var{address}.
771
772 This option may not work on all platforms.
773
774 @cindex BindToInterface
775 @item BindToInterface = <@var{interface}> [experimental]
776 If you have more than one network interface in your computer, tinc will
777 by default listen on all of them for incoming connections.  It is
778 possible to bind tinc to a single interface like eth0 or ppp0 with this
779 variable.
780
781 This option may not work on all platforms.
782
783 @cindex Broadcast
784 @item Broadcast = <no | mst | direct> (mst) [experimental]
785 This option selects the way broadcast packets are sent to other daemons.
786 @emph{NOTE: all nodes in a VPN must use the same Broadcast mode, otherwise routing loops can form.}
787
788 @table @asis
789 @item no
790 Broadcast packets are never sent to other nodes.
791
792 @item mst
793 Broadcast packets are sent and forwarded via the VPN's Minimum Spanning Tree.
794 This ensures broadcast packets reach all nodes.
795
796 @item direct
797 Broadcast packets are sent directly to all nodes that can be reached directly.
798 Broadcast packets received from other nodes are never forwarded.
799 If the IndirectData option is also set, broadcast packets will only be sent to nodes which we have a meta connection to.
800 @end table
801
802 @cindex ConnectTo
803 @item ConnectTo = <@var{name}>
804 Specifies which other tinc daemon to connect to on startup.
805 Multiple ConnectTo variables may be specified,
806 in which case outgoing connections to each specified tinc daemon are made.
807 The names should be known to this tinc daemon
808 (i.e., there should be a host configuration file for the name on the ConnectTo line).
809
810 If you don't specify a host with ConnectTo,
811 tinc won't try to connect to other daemons at all,
812 and will instead just listen for incoming connections.
813
814 @cindex DecrementTTL
815 @item DecrementTTL = <yes | no> (no) [experimental]
816 When enabled, tinc will decrement the Time To Live field in IPv4 packets, or the Hop Limit field in IPv6 packets,
817 before forwarding a received packet to the virtual network device or to another node,
818 and will drop packets that have a TTL value of zero,
819 in which case it will send an ICMP Time Exceeded packet back.
820
821 Do not use this option if you use switch mode and want to use IPv6.
822
823 @cindex Device
824 @item Device = <@var{device}> (@file{/dev/tap0}, @file{/dev/net/tun} or other depending on platform)
825 The virtual network device to use.
826 Tinc will automatically detect what kind of device it is.
827 Under Windows, use @var{Interface} instead of @var{Device}.
828 Note that you can only use one device per daemon.
829 See also @ref{Device files}.
830
831 @cindex DeviceType
832 @item DeviceType = <@var{type}> (platform dependent)
833 The type of the virtual network device.
834 Tinc will normally automatically select the right type of tun/tap interface, and this option should not be used.
835 However, this option can be used to select one of the special interface types, if support for them is compiled in.
836
837 @table @asis
838 @cindex dummy
839 @item dummy
840 Use a dummy interface.
841 No packets are ever read or written to a virtual network device.
842 Useful for testing, or when setting up a node that only forwards packets for other nodes.
843
844 @cindex raw_socket
845 @item raw_socket
846 Open a raw socket, and bind it to a pre-existing
847 @var{Interface} (eth0 by default).
848 All packets are read from this interface.
849 Packets received for the local node are written to the raw socket.
850 However, at least on Linux, the operating system does not process IP packets destined for the local host.
851
852 @cindex multicast
853 @item multicast
854 Open a multicast UDP socket and bind it to the address and port (separated by spaces) and optionally a TTL value specified using @var{Device}.
855 Packets are read from and written to this multicast socket.
856 This can be used to connect to UML, QEMU or KVM instances listening on the same multicast address.
857 Do NOT connect multiple tinc daemons to the same multicast address, this will very likely cause routing loops.
858 Also note that this can cause decrypted VPN packets to be sent out on a real network if misconfigured.
859
860 @cindex UML
861 @item uml (not compiled in by default)
862 Create a UNIX socket with the filename specified by
863 @var{Device}, or @file{@value{runstatedir}/@var{netname}.umlsocket}
864 if not specified.
865 Tinc will wait for a User Mode Linux instance to connect to this socket.
866
867 @cindex VDE
868 @item vde (not compiled in by default)
869 Uses the libvdeplug library to connect to a Virtual Distributed Ethernet switch,
870 using the UNIX socket specified by
871 @var{Device}, or @file{@value{runstatedir}/vde.ctl}
872 if not specified.
873 @end table
874
875 Also, in case tinc does not seem to correctly interpret packets received from the virtual network device,
876 it can be used to change the way packets are interpreted:
877
878 @table @asis
879 @item tun (BSD and Linux)
880 Set type to tun.
881 Depending on the platform, this can either be with or without an address family header (see below).
882
883 @cindex tunnohead
884 @item tunnohead (BSD)
885 Set type to tun without an address family header.
886 Tinc will expect packets read from the virtual network device to start with an IP header.
887 On some platforms IPv6 packets cannot be read from or written to the device in this mode.
888
889 @cindex tunifhead
890 @item tunifhead (BSD)
891 Set type to tun with an address family header.
892 Tinc will expect packets read from the virtual network device
893 to start with a four byte header containing the address family,
894 followed by an IP header.
895 This mode should support both IPv4 and IPv6 packets.
896
897 @cindex utun
898 @item utun (OS X)
899 Set type to utun.
900 This is only supported on OS X version 10.6.8 and higher, but doesn't require the tuntaposx module.
901 This mode should support both IPv4 and IPv6 packets.
902
903 @item tap (BSD and Linux)
904 Set type to tap.
905 Tinc will expect packets read from the virtual network device
906 to start with an Ethernet header.
907 @end table
908
909 @cindex DirectOnly
910 @item DirectOnly = <yes|no> (no) [experimental]
911 When this option is enabled, packets that cannot be sent directly to the destination node,
912 but which would have to be forwarded by an intermediate node, are dropped instead.
913 When combined with the IndirectData option,
914 packets for nodes for which we do not have a meta connection with are also dropped.
915
916 @cindex Forwarding
917 @item Forwarding = <off|internal|kernel> (internal) [experimental]
918 This option selects the way indirect packets are forwarded.
919
920 @table @asis
921 @item off
922 Incoming packets that are not meant for the local node,
923 but which should be forwarded to another node, are dropped.
924
925 @item internal
926 Incoming packets that are meant for another node are forwarded by tinc internally.
927
928 This is the default mode, and unless you really know you need another forwarding mode, don't change it.
929
930 @item kernel
931 Incoming packets are always sent to the TUN/TAP device, even if the packets are not for the local node.
932 This is less efficient, but allows the kernel to apply its routing and firewall rules on them,
933 and can also help debugging.
934 @end table
935
936 @cindex GraphDumpFile
937 @item GraphDumpFile = <@var{filename}> [experimental]
938 If this option is present,
939 tinc will dump the current network graph to the file @var{filename}
940 every minute, unless there were no changes to the graph.
941 The file is in a format that can be read by graphviz tools.
942 If @var{filename} starts with a pipe symbol |,
943 then the rest of the filename is interpreted as a shell command
944 that is executed, the graph is then sent to stdin.
945
946 @cindex Hostnames
947 @item Hostnames = <yes|no> (no)
948 This option selects whether IP addresses (both real and on the VPN)
949 should be resolved.  Since DNS lookups are blocking, it might affect
950 tinc's efficiency, even stopping the daemon for a few seconds every time
951 it does a lookup if your DNS server is not responding.
952
953 This does not affect resolving hostnames to IP addresses from the
954 configuration file, but whether hostnames should be resolved while logging.
955
956 @cindex IffOneQueue
957 @item IffOneQueue = <yes|no> (no) [experimental]
958 (Linux only) Set IFF_ONE_QUEUE flag on TUN/TAP devices.
959
960 @cindex Interface
961 @item Interface = <@var{interface}>
962 Defines the name of the interface corresponding to the virtual network device.
963 Depending on the operating system and the type of device this may or may not actually set the name of the interface.
964 Under Windows, this variable is used to select which network interface will be used.
965 If you specified a Device, this variable is almost always already correctly set.
966
967 @cindex KeyExpire
968 @item KeyExpire = <@var{seconds}> (3600)
969 This option controls the time the encryption keys used to encrypt the data
970 are valid.  It is common practice to change keys at regular intervals to
971 make it even harder for crackers, even though it is thought to be nearly
972 impossible to crack a single key.
973
974 @cindex LocalDiscovery
975 @item LocalDiscovery = <yes | no> (no) [experimental]
976 When enabled, tinc will try to detect peers that are on the same local network.
977 This will allow direct communication using LAN addresses, even if both peers are behind a NAT
978 and they only ConnectTo a third node outside the NAT,
979 which normally would prevent the peers from learning each other's LAN address.
980
981 Currently, local discovery is implemented by sending broadcast packets to the LAN during path MTU discovery.
982 This feature may not work in all possible situations.
983
984 @cindex MACExpire
985 @item MACExpire = <@var{seconds}> (600)
986 This option controls the amount of time MAC addresses are kept before they are removed.
987 This only has effect when Mode is set to "switch".
988
989 @cindex MaxTimeout
990 @item MaxTimeout = <@var{seconds}> (900)
991 This is the maximum delay before trying to reconnect to other tinc daemons.
992
993 @cindex Mode
994 @item Mode = <router|switch|hub> (router)
995 This option selects the way packets are routed to other daemons.
996
997 @table @asis
998 @cindex router
999 @item router
1000 In this mode Subnet
1001 variables in the host configuration files will be used to form a routing table.
1002 Only unicast packets of routable protocols (IPv4 and IPv6) are supported in this mode.
1003
1004 This is the default mode, and unless you really know you need another mode, don't change it.
1005
1006 @cindex switch
1007 @item switch
1008 In this mode the MAC addresses of the packets on the VPN will be used to
1009 dynamically create a routing table just like an Ethernet switch does.
1010 Unicast, multicast and broadcast packets of every protocol that runs over Ethernet are supported in this mode
1011 at the cost of frequent broadcast ARP requests and routing table updates.
1012
1013 This mode is primarily useful if you want to bridge Ethernet segments.
1014
1015 @cindex hub
1016 @item hub
1017 This mode is almost the same as the switch mode, but instead
1018 every packet will be broadcast to the other daemons
1019 while no routing table is managed.
1020 @end table
1021
1022 @cindex Name
1023 @item Name = <@var{name}> [required]
1024 This is a symbolic name for this connection.
1025 The name must consist only of alphanumeric and underscore characters (a-z, A-Z, 0-9 and _).
1026
1027 If Name starts with a $, then the contents of the environment variable that follows will be used.
1028 In that case, invalid characters will be converted to underscores.
1029 If Name is $HOST, but no such environment variable exist,
1030 the hostname will be read using the gethostname() system call.
1031
1032 @cindex PingInterval
1033 @item PingInterval = <@var{seconds}> (60)
1034 The number of seconds of inactivity that tinc will wait before sending a
1035 probe to the other end.
1036
1037 @cindex PingTimeout
1038 @item PingTimeout = <@var{seconds}> (5)
1039 The number of seconds to wait for a response to pings or to allow meta
1040 connections to block. If the other end doesn't respond within this time,
1041 the connection is terminated, and the others will be notified of this.
1042
1043 @cindex PriorityInheritance
1044 @item PriorityInheritance = <yes|no> (no) [experimental]
1045 When this option is enabled the value of the TOS field of tunneled IPv4 packets
1046 will be inherited by the UDP packets that are sent out.
1047
1048 @cindex PrivateKey
1049 @item PrivateKey = <@var{key}> [obsolete]
1050 This is the RSA private key for tinc. However, for safety reasons it is
1051 advised to store private keys of any kind in separate files. This prevents
1052 accidental eavesdropping if you are editing the configuration file.
1053
1054 @cindex PrivateKeyFile
1055 @item PrivateKeyFile = <@var{path}> (@file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/rsa_key.priv})
1056 This is the full path name of the RSA private key file that was
1057 generated by @samp{tincd --generate-keys}.  It must be a full path, not a
1058 relative directory.
1059
1060 @cindex ProcessPriority
1061 @item ProcessPriority = <low|normal|high>
1062 When this option is used the priority of the tincd process will be adjusted.
1063 Increasing the priority may help to reduce latency and packet loss on the VPN.
1064
1065 @cindex Proxy
1066 @item Proxy = socks4 | socks5 | http | exec @var{...} [experimental]
1067 Use a proxy when making outgoing connections.
1068 The following proxy types are currently supported:
1069
1070 @table @asis
1071 @cindex socks4
1072 @item socks4 <@var{address}> <@var{port}> [<@var{username}>]
1073 Connects to the proxy using the SOCKS version 4 protocol.
1074 Optionally, a @var{username} can be supplied which will be passed on to the proxy server.
1075
1076 @cindex socks5
1077 @item socks5 <@var{address}> <@var{port}> [<@var{username}> <@var{password}>]
1078 Connect to the proxy using the SOCKS version 5 protocol.
1079 If a @var{username} and @var{password} are given, basic username/password authentication will be used,
1080 otherwise no authentication will be used.
1081
1082 @cindex http
1083 @item http <@var{address}> <@var{port}>
1084 Connects to the proxy and sends a HTTP CONNECT request.
1085
1086 @cindex exec
1087 @item exec <@var{command}>
1088 Executes the given command which should set up the outgoing connection.
1089 The environment variables @env{NAME}, @env{NODE}, @env{REMOTEADDRES} and @env{REMOTEPORT} are available.
1090 @end table
1091
1092 @cindex ReplayWindow
1093 @item ReplayWindow = <bytes> (16)
1094 This is the size of the replay tracking window for each remote node, in bytes.
1095 The window is a bitfield which tracks 1 packet per bit, so for example
1096 the default setting of 16 will track up to 128 packets in the window. In high
1097 bandwidth scenarios, setting this to a higher value can reduce packet loss from
1098 the interaction of replay tracking with underlying real packet loss and/or
1099 reordering. Setting this to zero will disable replay tracking completely and
1100 pass all traffic, but leaves tinc vulnerable to replay-based attacks on your
1101 traffic.
1102
1103 @cindex StrictSubnets
1104 @item StrictSubnets = <yes|no> (no) [experimental]
1105 When this option is enabled tinc will only use Subnet statements which are
1106 present in the host config files in the local
1107 @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/hosts/} directory.
1108 Subnets learned via connections to other nodes and which are not
1109 present in the local host config files are ignored.
1110
1111 @cindex TunnelServer
1112 @item TunnelServer = <yes|no> (no) [experimental]
1113 When this option is enabled tinc will no longer forward information between other tinc daemons,
1114 and will only allow connections with nodes for which host config files are present in the local
1115 @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/hosts/} directory.
1116 Setting this options also implicitly sets StrictSubnets.
1117
1118 @cindex UDPRcvBuf
1119 @item UDPRcvBuf = <bytes> (OS default)
1120 Sets the socket receive buffer size for the UDP socket, in bytes.
1121 If unset, the default buffer size will be used by the operating system.
1122
1123 @cindex UDPSndBuf
1124 @item UDPSndBuf = <bytes> Pq OS default
1125 Sets the socket send buffer size for the UDP socket, in bytes.
1126 If unset, the default buffer size will be used by the operating system.
1127
1128 @end table
1129
1130
1131 @c ==================================================================
1132 @node       Host configuration variables
1133 @subsection Host configuration variables
1134
1135 @table @asis
1136 @cindex Address
1137 @item Address = <@var{IP address}|@var{hostname}> [<port>] [recommended]
1138 This variable is only required if you want to connect to this host.  It
1139 must resolve to the external IP address where the host can be reached,
1140 not the one that is internal to the VPN.
1141 If no port is specified, the default Port is used.
1142 Multiple Address variables can be specified, in which case each address will be
1143 tried until a working connection has been established.
1144
1145 @cindex Cipher
1146 @item Cipher = <@var{cipher}> (aes-256-cbc)
1147 The symmetric cipher algorithm used to encrypt UDP packets.
1148 Any cipher supported by LibreSSL or OpenSSL is recognized.
1149 Furthermore, specifying "none" will turn off packet encryption.
1150 It is best to use only those ciphers which support CBC mode.
1151
1152 @cindex ClampMSS
1153 @item ClampMSS = <yes|no> (yes)
1154 This option specifies whether tinc should clamp the maximum segment size (MSS)
1155 of TCP packets to the path MTU. This helps in situations where ICMP
1156 Fragmentation Needed or Packet too Big messages are dropped by firewalls.
1157
1158 @cindex Compression
1159 @item Compression = <@var{level}> (0)
1160 This option sets the level of compression used for UDP packets.
1161 Possible values are 0 (off), 1 (fast zlib) and any integer up to 9 (best zlib),
1162 10 (fast lzo) and 11 (best lzo).
1163
1164 @cindex Digest
1165 @item Digest = <@var{digest}> (sha256)
1166 The digest algorithm used to authenticate UDP packets.
1167 Any digest supported by LibreSSL or OpenSSL is recognized.
1168 Furthermore, specifying "none" will turn off packet authentication.
1169
1170 @cindex IndirectData
1171 @item IndirectData = <yes|no> (no)
1172 This option specifies whether other tinc daemons besides the one you
1173 specified with ConnectTo can make a direct connection to you.  This is
1174 especially useful if you are behind a firewall and it is impossible to
1175 make a connection from the outside to your tinc daemon.  Otherwise, it
1176 is best to leave this option out or set it to no.
1177
1178 @cindex MACLength
1179 @item MACLength = <@var{bytes}> (4)
1180 The length of the message authentication code used to authenticate UDP packets.
1181 Can be anything from 0
1182 up to the length of the digest produced by the digest algorithm.
1183
1184 @cindex PMTU
1185 @item PMTU = <@var{mtu}> (1514)
1186 This option controls the initial path MTU to this node.
1187
1188 @cindex PMTUDiscovery
1189 @item PMTUDiscovery = <yes|no> (yes)
1190 When this option is enabled, tinc will try to discover the path MTU to this node.
1191 After the path MTU has been discovered, it will be enforced on the VPN.
1192
1193 @cindex Port
1194 @item Port = <@var{port}> (655)
1195 This is the port this tinc daemon listens on.
1196 You can use decimal portnumbers or symbolic names (as listed in @file{/etc/services}).
1197
1198 @cindex PublicKey
1199 @item PublicKey = <@var{key}> [obsolete]
1200 This is the RSA public key for this host.
1201
1202 @cindex PublicKeyFile
1203 @item PublicKeyFile = <@var{path}> [obsolete]
1204 This is the full path name of the RSA public key file that was generated
1205 by @samp{tincd --generate-keys}.  It must be a full path, not a relative
1206 directory.
1207
1208 @cindex PEM format
1209 From version 1.0pre4 on tinc will store the public key directly into the
1210 host configuration file in PEM format, the above two options then are not
1211 necessary. Either the PEM format is used, or exactly
1212 @strong{one of the above two options} must be specified
1213 in each host configuration file, if you want to be able to establish a
1214 connection with that host.
1215
1216 @cindex Subnet
1217 @item Subnet = <@var{address}[/@var{prefixlength}[#@var{weight}]]>
1218 The subnet which this tinc daemon will serve.
1219 Tinc tries to look up which other daemon it should send a packet to by searching the appropriate subnet.
1220 If the packet matches a subnet,
1221 it will be sent to the daemon who has this subnet in his host configuration file.
1222 Multiple subnet lines can be specified for each daemon.
1223
1224 Subnets can either be single MAC, IPv4 or IPv6 addresses,
1225 in which case a subnet consisting of only that single address is assumed,
1226 or they can be a IPv4 or IPv6 network address with a prefixlength.
1227 For example, IPv4 subnets must be in a form like 192.168.1.0/24,
1228 where 192.168.1.0 is the network address and 24 is the number of bits set in the netmask.
1229 Note that subnets like 192.168.1.1/24 are invalid!
1230 Read a networking HOWTO/FAQ/guide if you don't understand this.
1231 IPv6 subnets are notated like fec0:0:0:1::/64.
1232 MAC addresses are notated like 0:1a:2b:3c:4d:5e.
1233
1234 @cindex CIDR notation
1235 Prefixlength is the number of bits set to 1 in the netmask part; for
1236 example: netmask 255.255.255.0 would become /24, 255.255.252.0 becomes
1237 /22. This conforms to standard CIDR notation as described in
1238 @uref{https://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc1519.txt, RFC1519}
1239
1240 @cindex Subnet weight
1241 A Subnet can be given a weight to indicate its priority over identical Subnets
1242 owned by different nodes. The default weight is 10. Lower values indicate
1243 higher priority. Packets will be sent to the node with the highest priority,
1244 unless that node is not reachable, in which case the node with the next highest
1245 priority will be tried, and so on.
1246
1247 @cindex TCPonly
1248 @item TCPonly = <yes|no> (no) [deprecated]
1249 If this variable is set to yes, then the packets are tunnelled over a
1250 TCP connection instead of a UDP connection.  This is especially useful
1251 for those who want to run a tinc daemon from behind a masquerading
1252 firewall, or if UDP packet routing is disabled somehow.
1253 Setting this options also implicitly sets IndirectData.
1254
1255 Since version 1.0.10, tinc will automatically detect whether communication via
1256 UDP is possible or not.
1257 @end table
1258
1259
1260 @c ==================================================================
1261 @node       Scripts
1262 @subsection Scripts
1263
1264 @cindex scripts
1265 Apart from reading the server and host configuration files,
1266 tinc can also run scripts at certain moments.
1267 Below is a list of filenames of scripts and a description of when they are run.
1268 A script is only run if it exists and if it is executable.
1269
1270 Scripts are run synchronously;
1271 this means that tinc will temporarily stop processing packets until the called script finishes executing.
1272 This guarantees that scripts will execute in the exact same order as the events that trigger them.
1273 If you need to run commands asynchronously, you have to ensure yourself that they are being run in the background.
1274
1275 Under Windows (not Cygwin), the scripts must have the extension .bat.
1276
1277 @table @file
1278 @cindex tinc-up
1279 @item @value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/tinc-up
1280 This is the most important script.
1281 If it is present it will be executed right after the tinc daemon has been
1282 started and has connected to the virtual network device.
1283 It should be used to set up the corresponding network interface,
1284 but can also be used to start other things.
1285
1286 Under Windows you can use the Network Connections control panel instead of creating this script.
1287
1288 @cindex tinc-down
1289 @item @value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/tinc-down
1290 This script is started right before the tinc daemon quits.
1291
1292 @item @value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/hosts/@var{host}-up
1293 This script is started when the tinc daemon with name @var{host} becomes reachable.
1294
1295 @item @value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/hosts/@var{host}-down
1296 This script is started when the tinc daemon with name @var{host} becomes unreachable.
1297
1298 @item @value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/host-up
1299 This script is started when any host becomes reachable.
1300
1301 @item @value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/host-down
1302 This script is started when any host becomes unreachable.
1303
1304 @item @value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/subnet-up
1305 This script is started when a subnet becomes reachable.
1306 The Subnet and the node it belongs to are passed in environment variables.
1307
1308 @item @value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/subnet-down
1309 This script is started when a subnet becomes unreachable.
1310 @end table
1311
1312 @cindex environment variables
1313 The scripts are started without command line arguments,
1314 but can make use of certain environment variables.
1315 Under UNIX like operating systems the names of environment variables must be preceded by a $ in scripts.
1316 Under Windows, in @file{.bat} files, they have to be put between % signs.
1317
1318 @table @env
1319 @cindex NETNAME
1320 @item NETNAME
1321 If a netname was specified, this environment variable contains it.
1322
1323 @cindex NAME
1324 @item NAME
1325 Contains the name of this tinc daemon.
1326
1327 @cindex DEVICE
1328 @item DEVICE
1329 Contains the name of the virtual network device that tinc uses.
1330
1331 @cindex INTERFACE
1332 @item INTERFACE
1333 Contains the name of the virtual network interface that tinc uses.
1334 This should be used for commands like ifconfig.
1335
1336 @cindex NODE
1337 @item NODE
1338 When a host becomes (un)reachable, this is set to its name.
1339 If a subnet becomes (un)reachable, this is set to the owner of that subnet.
1340
1341 @cindex REMOTEADDRESS
1342 @item REMOTEADDRESS
1343 When a host becomes (un)reachable, this is set to its real address.
1344
1345 @cindex REMOTEPORT
1346 @item REMOTEPORT
1347 When a host becomes (un)reachable,
1348 this is set to the port number it uses for communication with other tinc daemons.
1349
1350 @cindex SUBNET
1351 @item SUBNET
1352 When a subnet becomes (un)reachable, this is set to the subnet.
1353
1354 @cindex WEIGHT
1355 @item WEIGHT
1356 When a subnet becomes (un)reachable, this is set to the subnet weight.
1357
1358 @end table
1359
1360
1361 @c ==================================================================
1362 @node       How to configure
1363 @subsection How to configure
1364
1365 @subsubheading Step 1.  Creating the main configuration file
1366
1367 The main configuration file will be called @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/tinc.conf}.
1368 Adapt the following example to create a basic configuration file:
1369
1370 @example
1371 Name = @var{yourname}
1372 Device = @file{/dev/tap0}
1373 @end example
1374
1375 Then, if you know to which other tinc daemon(s) yours is going to connect,
1376 add `ConnectTo' values.
1377
1378 @subsubheading Step 2.  Creating your host configuration file
1379
1380 If you added a line containing `Name = yourname' in the main configuration file,
1381 you will need to create a host configuration file @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/hosts/yourname}.
1382 Adapt the following example to create a host configuration file:
1383
1384 @example
1385 Address = your.real.hostname.org
1386 Subnet = 192.168.1.0/24
1387 @end example
1388
1389 You can also use an IP address instead of a hostname.
1390 The `Subnet' specifies the address range that is local for @emph{your part of the VPN only}.
1391 If you have multiple address ranges you can specify more than one `Subnet'.
1392 You might also need to add a `Port' if you want your tinc daemon to run on a different port number than the default (655).
1393
1394
1395 @c ==================================================================
1396 @node    Generating keypairs
1397 @section Generating keypairs
1398
1399 @cindex key generation
1400 Now that you have already created the main configuration file and your host configuration file,
1401 you can easily create a public/private keypair by entering the following command:
1402
1403 @example
1404 tincd -n @var{netname} -K
1405 @end example
1406
1407 Tinc will generate a public and a private key and ask you where to put them.
1408 Just press enter to accept the defaults.
1409
1410
1411 @c ==================================================================
1412 @node    Network interfaces
1413 @section Network interfaces
1414
1415 Before tinc can start transmitting data over the tunnel, it must
1416 set up the virtual network interface.
1417
1418 First, decide which IP addresses you want to have associated with these
1419 devices, and what network mask they must have.
1420
1421 Tinc will open a virtual network device (@file{/dev/tun}, @file{/dev/tap0} or similar),
1422 which will also create a network interface called something like @samp{tun0}, @samp{tap0}.
1423 If you are using the Linux tun/tap driver, the network interface will by default have the same name as the @var{netname}.
1424 Under Windows you can change the name of the network interface from the Network Connections control panel.
1425
1426 @cindex tinc-up
1427 You can configure the network interface by putting ordinary ifconfig, route, and other commands
1428 to a script named @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/tinc-up}.
1429 When tinc starts, this script will be executed. When tinc exits, it will execute the script named
1430 @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/tinc-down}, but normally you don't need to create that script.
1431
1432 An example @file{tinc-up} script:
1433
1434 @example
1435 #!/bin/sh
1436 ifconfig $INTERFACE 192.168.1.1 netmask 255.255.0.0
1437 @end example
1438
1439 This script gives the interface an IP address and a netmask.
1440 The kernel will also automatically add a route to this interface, so normally you don't need
1441 to add route commands to the @file{tinc-up} script.
1442 The kernel will also bring the interface up after this command.
1443 @cindex netmask
1444 The netmask is the mask of the @emph{entire} VPN network, not just your
1445 own subnet.
1446
1447 The exact syntax of the ifconfig and route commands differs from platform to platform.
1448 You can look up the commands for setting addresses and adding routes in @ref{Platform specific information},
1449 but it is best to consult the manpages of those utilities on your platform.
1450
1451
1452 @c ==================================================================
1453 @node    Example configuration
1454 @section Example configuration
1455
1456
1457 @cindex example
1458 Imagine the following situation.  Branch A of our example `company' wants to connect
1459 three branch offices in B, C and D using the Internet.  All four offices
1460 have a 24/7 connection to the Internet.
1461
1462 A is going to serve as the center of the network.  B and C will connect
1463 to A, and D will connect to C.  Each office will be assigned their own IP
1464 network, 10.x.0.0.
1465
1466 @example
1467 A: net 10.1.0.0 mask 255.255.0.0 gateway 10.1.54.1 internet IP 1.2.3.4
1468 B: net 10.2.0.0 mask 255.255.0.0 gateway 10.2.1.12 internet IP 2.3.4.5
1469 C: net 10.3.0.0 mask 255.255.0.0 gateway 10.3.69.254 internet IP 3.4.5.6
1470 D: net 10.4.0.0 mask 255.255.0.0 gateway 10.4.3.32 internet IP 4.5.6.7
1471 @end example
1472
1473 Here, ``gateway'' is the VPN IP address of the machine that is running the
1474 tincd, and ``internet IP'' is the IP address of the firewall, which does not
1475 need to run tincd, but it must do a port forwarding of TCP and UDP on port
1476 655 (unless otherwise configured).
1477
1478 In this example, it is assumed that eth0 is the interface that points to
1479 the inner (physical) LAN of the office, although this could also be the
1480 same as the interface that leads to the Internet.  The configuration of
1481 the real interface is also shown as a comment, to give you an idea of
1482 how these example host is set up. All branches use the netname `company'
1483 for this particular VPN.
1484
1485 @subsubheading For Branch A
1486
1487 @emph{BranchA} would be configured like this:
1488
1489 In @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/company/tinc-up}:
1490
1491 @example
1492 # Real interface of internal network:
1493 # ifconfig eth0 10.1.54.1 netmask 255.255.0.0
1494
1495 ifconfig $INTERFACE 10.1.54.1 netmask 255.0.0.0
1496 @end example
1497
1498 and in @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/company/tinc.conf}:
1499
1500 @example
1501 Name = BranchA
1502 Device = /dev/tap0
1503 @end example
1504
1505 On all hosts, @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/company/hosts/BranchA} contains:
1506
1507 @example
1508 Subnet = 10.1.0.0/16
1509 Address = 1.2.3.4
1510
1511 -----BEGIN RSA PUBLIC KEY-----
1512 ...
1513 -----END RSA PUBLIC KEY-----
1514 @end example
1515
1516 Note that the IP addresses of eth0 and tap0 are the same.
1517 This is quite possible, if you make sure that the netmasks of the interfaces are different.
1518 It is in fact recommended to give both real internal network interfaces and tap interfaces the same IP address,
1519 since that will make things a lot easier to remember and set up.
1520
1521
1522 @subsubheading For Branch B
1523
1524 In @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/company/tinc-up}:
1525
1526 @example
1527 # Real interface of internal network:
1528 # ifconfig eth0 10.2.43.8 netmask 255.255.0.0
1529
1530 ifconfig $INTERFACE 10.2.1.12 netmask 255.0.0.0
1531 @end example
1532
1533 and in @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/company/tinc.conf}:
1534
1535 @example
1536 Name = BranchB
1537 ConnectTo = BranchA
1538 @end example
1539
1540 Note here that the internal address (on eth0) doesn't have to be the
1541 same as on the tap0 device.  Also, ConnectTo is given so that this node will
1542 always try to connect to BranchA.
1543
1544 On all hosts, in @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/company/hosts/BranchB}:
1545
1546 @example
1547 Subnet = 10.2.0.0/16
1548 Address = 2.3.4.5
1549
1550 -----BEGIN RSA PUBLIC KEY-----
1551 ...
1552 -----END RSA PUBLIC KEY-----
1553 @end example
1554
1555
1556 @subsubheading For Branch C
1557
1558 In @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/company/tinc-up}:
1559
1560 @example
1561 # Real interface of internal network:
1562 # ifconfig eth0 10.3.69.254 netmask 255.255.0.0
1563
1564 ifconfig $INTERFACE 10.3.69.254 netmask 255.0.0.0
1565 @end example
1566
1567 and in @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/company/tinc.conf}:
1568
1569 @example
1570 Name = BranchC
1571 ConnectTo = BranchA
1572 Device = /dev/tap1
1573 @end example
1574
1575 C already has another daemon that runs on port 655, so they have to
1576 reserve another port for tinc. It knows the portnumber it has to listen on
1577 from it's own host configuration file.
1578
1579 On all hosts, in @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/company/hosts/BranchC}:
1580
1581 @example
1582 Address = 3.4.5.6
1583 Subnet = 10.3.0.0/16
1584 Port = 2000
1585
1586 -----BEGIN RSA PUBLIC KEY-----
1587 ...
1588 -----END RSA PUBLIC KEY-----
1589 @end example
1590
1591
1592 @subsubheading For Branch D
1593
1594 In @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/company/tinc-up}:
1595
1596 @example
1597 # Real interface of internal network:
1598 # ifconfig eth0 10.4.3.32 netmask 255.255.0.0
1599
1600 ifconfig $INTERFACE 10.4.3.32 netmask 255.0.0.0
1601 @end example
1602
1603 and in @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/company/tinc.conf}:
1604
1605 @example
1606 Name = BranchD
1607 ConnectTo = BranchC
1608 Device = /dev/net/tun
1609 @end example
1610
1611 D will be connecting to C, which has a tincd running for this network on
1612 port 2000. It knows the port number from the host configuration file.
1613 Also note that since D uses the tun/tap driver, the network interface
1614 will not be called `tun' or `tap0' or something like that, but will
1615 have the same name as netname.
1616
1617 On all hosts, in @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/company/hosts/BranchD}:
1618
1619 @example
1620 Subnet = 10.4.0.0/16
1621 Address = 4.5.6.7
1622
1623 -----BEGIN RSA PUBLIC KEY-----
1624 ...
1625 -----END RSA PUBLIC KEY-----
1626 @end example
1627
1628 @subsubheading Key files
1629
1630 A, B, C and D all have generated a public/private keypair with the following command:
1631
1632 @example
1633 tincd -n company -K
1634 @end example
1635
1636 The private key is stored in @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/company/rsa_key.priv},
1637 the public key is put into the host configuration file in the @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/company/hosts/} directory.
1638 During key generation, tinc automatically guesses the right filenames based on the -n option and
1639 the Name directive in the @file{tinc.conf} file (if it is available).
1640
1641 @subsubheading Starting
1642
1643 After each branch has finished configuration and they have distributed
1644 the host configuration files amongst them, they can start their tinc daemons.
1645 They don't necessarily have to wait for the other branches to have started
1646 their daemons, tinc will try connecting until they are available.
1647
1648
1649 @c ==================================================================
1650 @node    Running tinc
1651 @chapter Running tinc
1652
1653 If everything else is done, you can start tinc by typing the following command:
1654
1655 @example
1656 tincd -n @var{netname}
1657 @end example
1658
1659 @cindex daemon
1660 Tinc will detach from the terminal and continue to run in the background like a good daemon.
1661 If there are any problems however you can try to increase the debug level
1662 and look in the syslog to find out what the problems are.
1663
1664 @menu
1665 * Runtime options::
1666 * Signals::
1667 * Debug levels::
1668 * Solving problems::
1669 * Error messages::
1670 * Sending bug reports::
1671 @end menu
1672
1673
1674 @c ==================================================================
1675 @node    Runtime options
1676 @section Runtime options
1677
1678 Besides the settings in the configuration file, tinc also accepts some
1679 command line options.
1680
1681 @cindex command line
1682 @cindex runtime options
1683 @cindex options
1684 @c from the manpage
1685 @table @option
1686 @item -c, --config=@var{path}
1687 Read configuration options from the directory @var{path}.  The default is
1688 @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/}.
1689
1690 @item -D, --no-detach
1691 Don't fork and detach.
1692 This will also disable the automatic restart mechanism for fatal errors.
1693
1694 @cindex debug level
1695 @item -d, --debug=@var{level}
1696 Set debug level to @var{level}.  The higher the debug level, the more gets
1697 logged.  Everything goes via syslog.
1698
1699 @item -k, --kill[=@var{signal}]
1700 Attempt to kill a running tincd (optionally with the specified @var{signal} instead of SIGTERM) and exit.
1701 Use it in conjunction with the -n option to make sure you kill the right tinc daemon.
1702 Under native Windows the optional argument is ignored,
1703 the service will always be stopped and removed.
1704
1705 @item -n, --net=@var{netname}
1706 Use configuration for net @var{netname}.
1707 This will let tinc read all configuration files from
1708 @file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/}.
1709 Specifying . for @var{netname} is the same as not specifying any @var{netname}.
1710 @xref{Multiple networks}.
1711
1712 @item -K, --generate-keys[=@var{bits}]
1713 Generate public/private keypair of @var{bits} length. If @var{bits} is not specified,
1714 2048 is the default. tinc will ask where you want to store the files,
1715 but will default to the configuration directory (you can use the -c or -n option
1716 in combination with -K). After that, tinc will quit.
1717
1718 @item -o, --option=[@var{HOST}.]@var{KEY}=@var{VALUE}
1719 Without specifying a @var{HOST}, this will set server configuration variable @var{KEY} to @var{VALUE}.
1720 If specified as @var{HOST}.@var{KEY}=@var{VALUE},
1721 this will set the host configuration variable @var{KEY} of the host named @var{HOST} to @var{VALUE}.
1722 This option can be used more than once to specify multiple configuration variables.
1723
1724 @item -L, --mlock
1725 Lock tinc into main memory.
1726 This will prevent sensitive data like shared private keys to be written to the system swap files/partitions.
1727
1728 @item --logfile[=@var{file}]
1729 Write log entries to a file instead of to the system logging facility.
1730 If @var{file} is omitted, the default is @file{@value{localstatedir}/log/tinc.@var{netname}.log}.
1731
1732 @item --pidfile=@var{file}
1733 Write PID to @var{file} instead of @file{@value{runstatedir}/tinc.@var{netname}.pid}.
1734
1735 @item --bypass-security
1736 Disables encryption and authentication.
1737 Only useful for debugging.
1738
1739 @item -R, --chroot
1740 Change process root directory to the directory where the config file is
1741 located (@file{@value{sysconfdir}/tinc/@var{netname}/} as determined by
1742 -n/--net option or as given by -c/--config option), for added security.
1743 The chroot is performed after all the initialization is done, after
1744 writing pid files and opening network sockets.
1745
1746 This option is best used in combination with the -U/--user option described below.
1747
1748 You will need to ensure the chroot environment contains all the files necessary
1749 for tinc to run correctly.
1750 Most importantly, for tinc to be able to resolve hostnames inside the chroot environment,
1751 you must copy @file{/etc/resolv.conf} into the chroot directory.
1752 If you want to be able to run scripts other than @file{tinc-up} in the chroot,
1753 you must ensure the appropriate shell is also installed in the chroot, along with all its dependencies.
1754
1755 @item -U, --user=@var{user}
1756 Switch to the given @var{user} after initialization, at the same time as
1757 chroot is performed (see --chroot above).  With this option tinc drops
1758 privileges, for added security.
1759
1760 @item --help
1761 Display a short reminder of these runtime options and terminate.
1762
1763 @item --version
1764 Output version information and exit.
1765
1766 @end table
1767
1768 @c ==================================================================
1769 @node    Signals
1770 @section Signals
1771
1772 @cindex signals
1773 You can also send the following signals to a running tincd process:
1774
1775 @c from the manpage
1776 @table @samp
1777
1778 @item ALRM
1779 Forces tinc to try to connect to all uplinks immediately.
1780 Usually tinc attempts to do this itself,
1781 but increases the time it waits between the attempts each time it failed,
1782 and if tinc didn't succeed to connect to an uplink the first time after it started,
1783 it defaults to the maximum time of 15 minutes.
1784
1785 @item HUP
1786 Partially rereads configuration files.
1787 Connections to hosts whose host config file are removed are closed.
1788 New outgoing connections specified in @file{tinc.conf} will be made.
1789 If the --logfile option is used, this will also close and reopen the log file,
1790 useful when log rotation is used.
1791
1792 @item INT
1793 Temporarily increases debug level to 5.
1794 Send this signal again to revert to the original level.
1795
1796 @item USR1
1797 Dumps the connection list to syslog.
1798
1799 @item USR2
1800 Dumps virtual network device statistics, all known nodes, edges and subnets to syslog.
1801
1802 @item WINCH
1803 Purges all information remembered about unreachable nodes.
1804
1805 @end table
1806
1807 @c ==================================================================
1808 @node    Debug levels
1809 @section Debug levels
1810
1811 @cindex debug levels
1812 The tinc daemon can send a lot of messages to the syslog.
1813 The higher the debug level, the more messages it will log.
1814 Each level inherits all messages of the previous level:
1815
1816 @c from the manpage
1817 @table @samp
1818
1819 @item 0
1820 This will log a message indicating tinc has started along with a version number.
1821 It will also log any serious error.
1822
1823 @item 1
1824 This will log all connections that are made with other tinc daemons.
1825
1826 @item 2
1827 This will log status and error messages from scripts and other tinc daemons.
1828
1829 @item 3
1830 This will log all requests that are exchanged with other tinc daemons. These include
1831 authentication, key exchange and connection list updates.
1832
1833 @item 4
1834 This will log a copy of everything received on the meta socket.
1835
1836 @item 5
1837 This will log all network traffic over the virtual private network.
1838
1839 @end table
1840
1841 @c ==================================================================
1842 @node    Solving problems
1843 @section Solving problems
1844
1845 If tinc starts without problems, but if the VPN doesn't work, you will have to find the cause of the problem.
1846 The first thing to do is to start tinc with a high debug level in the foreground,
1847 so you can directly see everything tinc logs:
1848
1849 @example
1850 tincd -n @var{netname} -d5 -D
1851 @end example
1852
1853 If tinc does not log any error messages, then you might want to check the following things:
1854
1855 @itemize
1856 @item @file{tinc-up} script
1857 Does this script contain the right commands?
1858 Normally you must give the interface the address of this host on the VPN, and the netmask must be big enough so that the entire VPN is covered.
1859
1860 @item Subnet
1861 Does the Subnet (or Subnets) in the host configuration file of this host match the portion of the VPN that belongs to this host?
1862
1863 @item Firewalls and NATs
1864 Do you have a firewall or a NAT device (a masquerading firewall or perhaps an ADSL router that performs masquerading)?
1865 If so, check that it allows TCP and UDP traffic on port 655.
1866 If it masquerades and the host running tinc is behind it, make sure that it forwards TCP and UDP traffic to port 655 to the host running tinc.
1867 You can add @samp{TCPOnly = yes} to your host config file to force tinc to only use a single TCP connection,
1868 this works through most firewalls and NATs. Since version 1.0.10, tinc will automatically fall back to TCP if direct communication via UDP is not possible.
1869
1870 @end itemize
1871
1872
1873 @c ==================================================================
1874 @node    Error messages
1875 @section Error messages
1876
1877 What follows is a list of the most common error messages you might find in the logs.
1878 Some of them will only be visible if the debug level is high enough.
1879
1880 @table @samp
1881 @item Could not open /dev/tap0: No such device
1882
1883 @itemize
1884 @item You forgot to `modprobe netlink_dev' or `modprobe ethertap'.
1885 @item You forgot to compile `Netlink device emulation' in the kernel.
1886 @end itemize
1887
1888 @item Can't write to /dev/net/tun: No such device
1889
1890 @itemize
1891 @item You forgot to `modprobe tun'.
1892 @item You forgot to compile `Universal TUN/TAP driver' in the kernel.
1893 @item The tun device is located somewhere else in @file{/dev/}.
1894 @end itemize
1895
1896 @item Network address and prefix length do not match!
1897
1898 @itemize
1899 @item The Subnet field must contain a @emph{network} address, trailing bits should be 0.
1900 @item If you only want to use one IP address, set the netmask to /32.
1901 @end itemize
1902
1903 @item Error reading RSA key file `rsa_key.priv': No such file or directory
1904
1905 @itemize
1906 @item You forgot to create a public/private keypair.
1907 @item Specify the complete pathname to the private key file with the @samp{PrivateKeyFile} option.
1908 @end itemize
1909
1910 @item Warning: insecure file permissions for RSA private key file `rsa_key.priv'!
1911
1912 @itemize
1913 @item The private key file is readable by users other than root.
1914 Use chmod to correct the file permissions.
1915 @end itemize
1916
1917 @item Creating metasocket failed: Address family not supported
1918
1919 @itemize
1920 @item By default tinc tries to create both IPv4 and IPv6 sockets.
1921 On some platforms this might not be implemented.
1922 If the logs show @samp{Ready} later on, then at least one metasocket was created,
1923 and you can ignore this message.
1924 You can add @samp{AddressFamily = ipv4} to @file{tinc.conf} to prevent this from happening.
1925 @end itemize
1926
1927 @item Cannot route packet: unknown IPv4 destination 1.2.3.4
1928
1929 @itemize
1930 @item You try to send traffic to a host on the VPN for which no Subnet is known.
1931 @item If it is a broadcast address (ending in .255), it probably is a samba server or a Windows host sending broadcast packets.
1932 You can ignore it.
1933 @end itemize
1934
1935 @item Cannot route packet: ARP request for unknown address 1.2.3.4
1936
1937 @itemize
1938 @item You try to send traffic to a host on the VPN for which no Subnet is known.
1939 @end itemize
1940
1941 @item Packet with destination 1.2.3.4 is looping back to us!
1942
1943 @itemize
1944 @item Something is not configured right. Packets are being sent out to the
1945 virtual network device, but according to the Subnet directives in your host configuration
1946 file, those packets should go to your own host. Most common mistake is that
1947 you have a Subnet line in your host configuration file with a prefix length which is
1948 just as large as the prefix of the virtual network interface. The latter should in almost all
1949 cases be larger. Rethink your configuration.
1950 Note that you will only see this message if you specified a debug
1951 level of 5 or higher!
1952 @item Chances are that a @samp{Subnet = ...} line in the host configuration file of this tinc daemon is wrong.
1953 Change it to a subnet that is accepted locally by another interface,
1954 or if that is not the case, try changing the prefix length into /32.
1955 @end itemize
1956
1957 @item Node foo (1.2.3.4) is not reachable
1958
1959 @itemize
1960 @item Node foo does not have a connection anymore, its tinc daemon is not running or its connection to the Internet is broken.
1961 @end itemize
1962
1963 @item Received UDP packet from unknown source 1.2.3.4 (port 12345)
1964
1965 @itemize
1966 @item If you see this only sporadically, it is harmless and caused by a node sending packets using an old key.
1967 @end itemize
1968
1969 @item Got bad/bogus/unauthorized REQUEST from foo (1.2.3.4 port 12345)
1970
1971 @itemize
1972 @item Node foo does not have the right public/private keypair.
1973 Generate new keypairs and distribute them again.
1974 @item An attacker tries to gain access to your VPN.
1975 @item A network error caused corruption of metadata sent from foo.
1976 @end itemize
1977
1978 @end table
1979
1980 @c ==================================================================
1981 @node    Sending bug reports
1982 @section Sending bug reports
1983
1984 If you really can't find the cause of a problem, or if you suspect tinc is not working right,
1985 you can send us a bugreport, see @ref{Contact information}.
1986 Be sure to include the following information in your bugreport:
1987
1988 @itemize
1989 @item A clear description of what you are trying to achieve and what the problem is.
1990 @item What platform (operating system, version, hardware architecture) and which version of tinc you use.
1991 @item If compiling tinc fails, a copy of @file{config.log} and the error messages you get.
1992 @item Otherwise, a copy of @file{tinc.conf}, @file{tinc-up} and all files in the @file{hosts/} directory.
1993 @item The output of the commands @samp{ifconfig -a} and @samp{route -n} (or @samp{netstat -rn} if that doesn't work).
1994 @item The output of any command that fails to work as it should (like ping or traceroute).
1995 @end itemize
1996
1997 @c ==================================================================
1998 @node    Technical information
1999 @chapter Technical information
2000
2001
2002 @menu
2003 * The connection::
2004 * The meta-protocol::
2005 * Security::
2006 @end menu
2007
2008
2009 @c ==================================================================
2010 @node    The connection
2011 @section The connection
2012
2013 @cindex connection
2014 Tinc is a daemon that takes VPN data and transmit that to another host
2015 computer over the existing Internet infrastructure.
2016
2017 @menu
2018 * The UDP tunnel::
2019 * The meta-connection::
2020 @end menu
2021
2022
2023 @c ==================================================================
2024 @node    The UDP tunnel
2025 @subsection The UDP tunnel
2026
2027 @cindex virtual network device
2028 @cindex frame type
2029 The data itself is read from a character device file, the so-called
2030 @emph{virtual network device}.  This device is associated with a network
2031 interface.  Any data sent to this interface can be read from the device,
2032 and any data written to the device gets sent from the interface.
2033 There are two possible types of virtual network devices:
2034 `tun' style, which are point-to-point devices which can only handle IPv4 and/or IPv6 packets,
2035 and `tap' style, which are Ethernet devices and handle complete Ethernet frames.
2036
2037 So when tinc reads an Ethernet frame from the device, it determines its
2038 type. When tinc is in its default routing mode, it can handle IPv4 and IPv6
2039 packets. Depending on the Subnet lines, it will send the packets off to their destination IP address.
2040 In the `switch' and `hub' mode, tinc will use broadcasts and MAC address discovery
2041 to deduce the destination of the packets.
2042 Since the latter modes only depend on the link layer information,
2043 any protocol that runs over Ethernet is supported (for instance IPX and Appletalk).
2044 However, only `tap' style devices provide this information.
2045
2046 After the destination has been determined,
2047 the packet will be compressed (optionally),
2048 a sequence number will be added to the packet,
2049 the packet will then be encrypted
2050 and a message authentication code will be appended.
2051
2052 @cindex encapsulating
2053 @cindex UDP
2054 When that is done, time has come to actually transport the
2055 packet to the destination computer.  We do this by sending the packet
2056 over an UDP connection to the destination host.  This is called
2057 @emph{encapsulating}, the VPN packet (though now encrypted) is
2058 encapsulated in another IP datagram.
2059
2060 When the destination receives this packet, the same thing happens, only
2061 in reverse.  So it checks the message authentication code, decrypts the contents of the UDP datagram,
2062 checks the sequence number
2063 and writes the decrypted information to its own virtual network device.
2064
2065 If the virtual network device is a `tun' device (a point-to-point tunnel),
2066 there is no problem for the kernel to accept a packet.
2067 However, if it is a `tap' device (this is the only available type on FreeBSD),
2068 the destination MAC address must match that of the virtual network interface.
2069 If tinc is in its default routing mode, ARP does not work, so the correct destination MAC
2070 can not be known by the sending host.
2071 Tinc solves this by letting the receiving end detect the MAC address of its own virtual network interface
2072 and overwriting the destination MAC address of the received packet.
2073
2074 In switch or hub modes ARP does work so the sender already knows the correct destination MAC address.
2075 In those modes every interface should have a unique MAC address, so make sure they are not the same.
2076 Because switch and hub modes rely on MAC addresses to function correctly,
2077 these modes cannot be used on the following operating systems which don't have a `tap' style virtual network device:
2078 OpenBSD, NetBSD, Darwin and Solaris.
2079
2080
2081 @c ==================================================================
2082 @node    The meta-connection
2083 @subsection The meta-connection
2084
2085 Having only a UDP connection available is not enough.  Though suitable
2086 for transmitting data, we want to be able to reliably send other
2087 information, such as routing and session key information to somebody.
2088
2089 @cindex TCP
2090 TCP is a better alternative, because it already contains protection
2091 against information being lost, unlike UDP.
2092
2093 So we establish two connections.  One for the encrypted VPN data, and one
2094 for other information, the meta-data.  Hence, we call the second
2095 connection the meta-connection.  We can now be sure that the
2096 meta-information doesn't get lost on the way to another computer.
2097
2098 @cindex data-protocol
2099 @cindex meta-protocol
2100 Like with any communication, we must have a protocol, so that everybody
2101 knows what everything stands for, and how she should react.  Because we
2102 have two connections, we also have two protocols.  The protocol used for
2103 the UDP data is the ``data-protocol,'' the other one is the
2104 ``meta-protocol.''
2105
2106 The reason we don't use TCP for both protocols is that UDP is much
2107 better for encapsulation, even while it is less reliable.  The real
2108 problem is that when TCP would be used to encapsulate a TCP stream
2109 that's on the private network, for every packet sent there would be
2110 three ACKs sent instead of just one.  Furthermore, if there would be
2111 a timeout, both TCP streams would sense the timeout, and both would
2112 start re-sending packets.
2113
2114
2115 @c ==================================================================
2116 @node    The meta-protocol
2117 @section The meta-protocol
2118
2119 The meta protocol is used to tie all tinc daemons together, and
2120 exchange information about which tinc daemon serves which virtual
2121 subnet.
2122
2123 The meta protocol consists of requests that can be sent to the other
2124 side.  Each request has a unique number and several parameters.  All
2125 requests are represented in the standard ASCII character set.  It is
2126 possible to use tools such as telnet or netcat to connect to a tinc
2127 daemon started with the --bypass-security option
2128 and to read and write requests by hand, provided that one
2129 understands the numeric codes sent.
2130
2131 The authentication scheme is described in @ref{Authentication protocol}. After a
2132 successful authentication, the server and the client will exchange all the
2133 information about other tinc daemons and subnets they know of, so that both
2134 sides (and all the other tinc daemons behind them) have their information
2135 synchronised.
2136
2137 @cindex ADD_EDGE
2138 @cindex ADD_SUBNET
2139 @example
2140 message
2141 ------------------------------------------------------------------
2142 ADD_EDGE node1 node2 21.32.43.54 655 222 0
2143           |     |        |       |   |  +-> options
2144           |     |        |       |   +----> weight
2145           |     |        |       +--------> UDP port of node2
2146           |     |        +----------------> real address of node2
2147           |     +-------------------------> name of destination node
2148           +-------------------------------> name of source node
2149
2150 ADD_SUBNET node 192.168.1.0/24
2151             |         |     +--> prefixlength
2152             |         +--------> network address
2153             +------------------> owner of this subnet
2154 ------------------------------------------------------------------
2155 @end example
2156
2157 The ADD_EDGE messages are to inform other tinc daemons that a connection between
2158 two nodes exist. The address of the destination node is available so that
2159 VPN packets can be sent directly to that node.
2160
2161 The ADD_SUBNET messages inform other tinc daemons that certain subnets belong
2162 to certain nodes. tinc will use it to determine to which node a VPN packet has
2163 to be sent.
2164
2165 @cindex DEL_EDGE
2166 @cindex DEL_SUBNET
2167 @example
2168 message
2169 ------------------------------------------------------------------
2170 DEL_EDGE node1 node2
2171            |     +----> name of destination node
2172            +----------> name of source node
2173
2174 DEL_SUBNET node 192.168.1.0/24
2175              |         |     +--> prefixlength
2176              |         +--------> network address
2177              +------------------> owner of this subnet
2178 ------------------------------------------------------------------
2179 @end example
2180
2181 In case a connection between two daemons is closed or broken, DEL_EDGE messages
2182 are sent to inform the other daemons of that fact. Each daemon will calculate a
2183 new route to the the daemons, or mark them unreachable if there isn't any.
2184
2185 @cindex REQ_KEY
2186 @cindex ANS_KEY
2187 @cindex KEY_CHANGED
2188 @example
2189 message
2190 ------------------------------------------------------------------
2191 REQ_KEY origin destination
2192            |       +--> name of the tinc daemon it wants the key from
2193            +----------> name of the daemon that wants the key
2194
2195 ANS_KEY origin destination 4ae0b0a82d6e0078 91 64 4
2196            |       |       \______________/ |  |  +--> MAC length
2197            |       |               |        |  +-----> digest algorithm
2198            |       |               |        +--------> cipher algorithm
2199            |       |               +--> 128 bits key
2200            |       +--> name of the daemon that wants the key
2201            +----------> name of the daemon that uses this key
2202
2203 KEY_CHANGED origin
2204               +--> daemon that has changed it's packet key
2205 ------------------------------------------------------------------
2206 @end example
2207
2208 The keys used to encrypt VPN packets are not sent out directly. This is
2209 because it would generate a lot of traffic on VPNs with many daemons, and
2210 chances are that not every tinc daemon will ever send a packet to every
2211 other daemon. Instead, if a daemon needs a key it sends a request for it
2212 via the meta connection of the nearest hop in the direction of the
2213 destination.
2214
2215 @cindex PING
2216 @cindex PONG
2217 @example
2218 daemon  message
2219 ------------------------------------------------------------------
2220 origin  PING
2221 dest.   PONG
2222 ------------------------------------------------------------------
2223 @end example
2224
2225 There is also a mechanism to check if hosts are still alive. Since network
2226 failures or a crash can cause a daemon to be killed without properly
2227 shutting down the TCP connection, this is necessary to keep an up to date
2228 connection list. PINGs are sent at regular intervals, except when there
2229 is also some other traffic. A little bit of salt (random data) is added
2230 with each PING and PONG message, to make sure that long sequences of PING/PONG
2231 messages without any other traffic won't result in known plaintext.
2232
2233 This basically covers what is sent over the meta connection by tinc.
2234
2235
2236 @c ==================================================================
2237 @node    Security
2238 @section Security
2239
2240 @cindex TINC
2241 @cindex Cabal
2242 Tinc got its name from ``TINC,'' short for @emph{There Is No Cabal}; the
2243 alleged Cabal was/is an organisation that was said to keep an eye on the
2244 entire Internet.  As this is exactly what you @emph{don't} want, we named
2245 the tinc project after TINC.
2246
2247 @cindex SVPN
2248 But in order to be ``immune'' to eavesdropping, you'll have to encrypt
2249 your data.  Because tinc is a @emph{Secure} VPN (SVPN) daemon, it does
2250 exactly that: encrypt.
2251 Tinc by default uses blowfish encryption with 128 bit keys in CBC mode, 32 bit
2252 sequence numbers and 4 byte long message authentication codes to make sure
2253 eavesdroppers cannot get and cannot change any information at all from the
2254 packets they can intercept. The encryption algorithm and message authentication
2255 algorithm can be changed in the configuration. The length of the message
2256 authentication codes is also adjustable. The length of the key for the
2257 encryption algorithm is always the default length used by LibreSSL/OpenSSL.
2258
2259 @menu
2260 * Authentication protocol::
2261 * Encryption of network packets::
2262 * Security issues::
2263 @end menu
2264
2265
2266 @c ==================================================================
2267 @node       Authentication protocol
2268 @subsection Authentication protocol
2269
2270 @cindex authentication
2271 A new scheme for authentication in tinc has been devised, which offers some
2272 improvements over the protocol used in 1.0pre2 and 1.0pre3. Explanation is
2273 below.
2274
2275 @cindex ID
2276 @cindex META_KEY
2277 @cindex CHALLENGE
2278 @cindex CHAL_REPLY
2279 @cindex ACK
2280 @example
2281 daemon  message
2282 --------------------------------------------------------------------------
2283 client  <attempts connection>
2284
2285 server  <accepts connection>
2286
2287 client  ID client 12
2288               |   +---> version
2289               +-------> name of tinc daemon
2290
2291 server  ID server 12
2292               |   +---> version
2293               +-------> name of tinc daemon
2294
2295 client  META_KEY 5f0823a93e35b69e...7086ec7866ce582b
2296                  \_________________________________/
2297                                  +-> RSAKEYLEN bits totally random string S1,
2298                                      encrypted with server's public RSA key
2299
2300 server  META_KEY 6ab9c1640388f8f0...45d1a07f8a672630
2301                  \_________________________________/
2302                                  +-> RSAKEYLEN bits totally random string S2,
2303                                      encrypted with client's public RSA key
2304
2305 From now on:
2306  - the client will symmetrically encrypt outgoing traffic using S1
2307  - the server will symmetrically encrypt outgoing traffic using S2
2308
2309 client  CHALLENGE da02add1817c1920989ba6ae2a49cecbda0
2310                   \_________________________________/
2311                                  +-> CHALLEN bits totally random string H1
2312
2313 server  CHALLENGE 57fb4b2ccd70d6bb35a64c142f47e61d57f
2314                   \_________________________________/
2315                                  +-> CHALLEN bits totally random string H2
2316
2317 client  CHAL_REPLY 816a86
2318                       +-> 160 bits SHA1 of H2
2319
2320 server  CHAL_REPLY 928ffe
2321                       +-> 160 bits SHA1 of H1
2322
2323 After the correct challenge replies are received, both ends have proved
2324 their identity. Further information is exchanged.
2325
2326 client  ACK 655 123 0
2327              |   |  +-> options
2328                  |   +----> estimated weight
2329                  +--------> listening port of client
2330
2331 server  ACK 655 321 0
2332              |   |  +-> options
2333                  |   +----> estimated weight
2334                  +--------> listening port of server
2335 --------------------------------------------------------------------------
2336 @end example
2337
2338 This new scheme has several improvements, both in efficiency and security.
2339
2340 First of all, the server sends exactly the same kind of messages over the wire
2341 as the client. The previous versions of tinc first authenticated the client,
2342 and then the server. This scheme even allows both sides to send their messages
2343 simultaneously, there is no need to wait for the other to send something first.
2344 This means that any calculations that need to be done upon sending or receiving
2345 a message can also be done in parallel. This is especially important when doing
2346 RSA encryption/decryption. Given that these calculations are the main part of
2347 the CPU time spent for the authentication, speed is improved by a factor 2.
2348
2349 Second, only one RSA encrypted message is sent instead of two. This reduces the
2350 amount of information attackers can see (and thus use for a cryptographic
2351 attack). It also improves speed by a factor two, making the total speedup a
2352 factor 4.
2353
2354 Third, and most important:
2355 The symmetric cipher keys are exchanged first, the challenge is done
2356 afterwards. In the previous authentication scheme, because a man-in-the-middle
2357 could pass the challenge/chal_reply phase (by just copying the messages between
2358 the two real tinc daemons), but no information was exchanged that was really
2359 needed to read the rest of the messages, the challenge/chal_reply phase was of
2360 no real use. The man-in-the-middle was only stopped by the fact that only after
2361 the ACK messages were encrypted with the symmetric cipher. Potentially, it
2362 could even send it's own symmetric key to the server (if it knew the server's
2363 public key) and read some of the metadata the server would send it (it was
2364 impossible for the mitm to read actual network packets though). The new scheme
2365 however prevents this.
2366
2367 This new scheme makes sure that first of all, symmetric keys are exchanged. The
2368 rest of the messages are then encrypted with the symmetric cipher. Then, each
2369 side can only read received messages if they have their private key. The
2370 challenge is there to let the other side know that the private key is really
2371 known, because a challenge reply can only be sent back if the challenge is
2372 decrypted correctly, and that can only be done with knowledge of the private
2373 key.
2374
2375 Fourth: the first thing that is sent via the symmetric cipher encrypted
2376 connection is a totally random string, so that there is no known plaintext (for
2377 an attacker) in the beginning of the encrypted stream.
2378
2379
2380 @c ==================================================================
2381 @node       Encryption of network packets
2382 @subsection Encryption of network packets
2383 @cindex encryption
2384
2385 A data packet can only be sent if the encryption key is known to both
2386 parties, and the connection is  activated. If the encryption key is not
2387 known, a request is sent to the destination using the meta connection
2388 to retrieve it. The packet is stored in a queue while waiting for the
2389 key to arrive.
2390
2391 @cindex UDP
2392 The UDP packet containing the network packet from the VPN has the following layout:
2393
2394 @example
2395 ... | IP header | UDP header | seqno | VPN packet | MAC | UDP trailer
2396                              \___________________/\_____/
2397                                        |             |
2398                                        V             +---> digest algorithm
2399                          Encrypted with symmetric cipher
2400 @end example
2401
2402 So, the entire VPN packet is encrypted using a symmetric cipher, including a 32 bits
2403 sequence number that is added in front of the actual VPN packet, to act as a unique
2404 IV for each packet and to prevent replay attacks. A message authentication code
2405 is added to the UDP packet to prevent alteration of packets. By default the
2406 first 4 bytes of the digest are used for this, but this can be changed using
2407 the MACLength configuration variable.
2408
2409 @c ==================================================================
2410 @node    Security issues
2411 @subsection Security issues
2412
2413 In August 2000, we discovered the existence of a security hole in all versions
2414 of tinc up to and including 1.0pre2. This had to do with the way we exchanged
2415 keys. Since then, we have been working on a new authentication scheme to make
2416 tinc as secure as possible. The current version uses the LibreSSL or OpenSSL library and
2417 uses strong authentication with RSA keys.
2418
2419 On the 29th of December 2001, Jerome Etienne posted a security analysis of tinc
2420 1.0pre4. Due to a lack of sequence numbers and a message authentication code
2421 for each packet, an attacker could possibly disrupt certain network services or
2422 launch a denial of service attack by replaying intercepted packets. The current
2423 version adds sequence numbers and message authentication codes to prevent such
2424 attacks.
2425
2426 On the 15th of September 2003, Peter Gutmann posted a security analysis of tinc
2427 1.0.1. He argues that the 32 bit sequence number used by tinc is not a good IV,
2428 that tinc's default length of 4 bytes for the MAC is too short, and he doesn't
2429 like tinc's use of RSA during authentication. We do not know of a security hole
2430 in this version of tinc, but tinc's security is not as strong as TLS or IPsec.
2431 We will address these issues in tinc 2.0.
2432
2433 Cryptography is a hard thing to get right. We cannot make any
2434 guarantees. Time, review and feedback are the only things that can
2435 prove the security of any cryptographic product. If you wish to review
2436 tinc or give us feedback, you are stronly encouraged to do so.
2437
2438
2439 @c ==================================================================
2440 @node    Platform specific information
2441 @chapter Platform specific information
2442
2443 @menu
2444 * Interface configuration::
2445 * Routes::
2446 * Automatically starting tinc::
2447 @end menu
2448
2449 @c ==================================================================
2450 @node    Interface configuration
2451 @section Interface configuration
2452
2453 When configuring an interface, one normally assigns it an address and a
2454 netmask.  The address uniquely identifies the host on the network attached to
2455 the interface.  The netmask, combined with the address, forms a subnet.  It is
2456 used to add a route to the routing table instructing the kernel to send all
2457 packets which fall into that subnet to that interface.  Because all packets for
2458 the entire VPN should go to the virtual network interface used by tinc, the
2459 netmask should be such that it encompasses the entire VPN.
2460
2461 For IPv4 addresses:
2462
2463 @multitable {Darwin (Mac OS X)} {ifconfig route add -bla network address netmask netmask prefixlength interface}
2464 @item Linux
2465 @tab @code{ifconfig} @var{interface} @var{address} @code{netmask} @var{netmask}
2466 @item Linux iproute2
2467 @tab @code{ip addr add} @var{address}@code{/}@var{prefixlength} @code{dev} @var{interface}
2468 @item FreeBSD
2469 @tab @code{ifconfig} @var{interface} @var{address} @code{netmask} @var{netmask}
2470 @item OpenBSD
2471 @tab @code{ifconfig} @var{interface} @var{address} @code{netmask} @var{netmask}
2472 @item NetBSD
2473 @tab @code{ifconfig} @var{interface} @var{address} @code{netmask} @var{netmask}
2474 @item Solaris
2475 @tab @code{ifconfig} @var{interface} @var{address} @code{netmask} @var{netmask}
2476 @item Darwin (Mac OS X)
2477 @tab @code{ifconfig} @var{interface} @var{address} @code{netmask} @var{netmask}
2478 @item Windows
2479 @tab @code{netsh interface ip set address} @var{interface} @code{static} @var{address} @var{netmask}
2480 @end multitable
2481
2482 For IPv6 addresses:
2483
2484 @multitable {Darwin (Mac OS X)} {ifconfig route add -bla network address netmask netmask prefixlength interface}
2485 @item Linux
2486 @tab @code{ifconfig} @var{interface} @code{add} @var{address}@code{/}@var{prefixlength}
2487 @item FreeBSD
2488 @tab @code{ifconfig} @var{interface} @code{inet6} @var{address} @code{prefixlen} @var{prefixlength}
2489 @item OpenBSD
2490 @tab @code{ifconfig} @var{interface} @code{inet6} @var{address} @code{prefixlen} @var{prefixlength}
2491 @item NetBSD
2492 @tab @code{ifconfig} @var{interface} @code{inet6} @var{address} @code{prefixlen} @var{prefixlength}
2493 @item Solaris
2494 @tab @code{ifconfig} @var{interface} @code{inet6 plumb up}
2495 @item
2496 @tab @code{ifconfig} @var{interface} @code{inet6 addif} @var{address} @var{address}
2497 @item Darwin (Mac OS X)
2498 @tab @code{ifconfig} @var{interface} @code{inet6} @var{address} @code{prefixlen} @var{prefixlength}
2499 @item Windows
2500 @tab @code{netsh interface ipv6 add address} @var{interface} @code{static} @var{address}/@var{prefixlength}
2501 @end multitable
2502
2503 On some platforms, when running tinc in switch mode, the VPN interface must be set to tap mode with an ifconfig command:
2504
2505 @multitable {Darwin (Mac OS X)} {ifconfig route add -bla network address netmask netmask prefixlength interface}
2506 @item OpenBSD
2507 @tab @code{ifconfig} @var{interface} @code{link0}
2508 @end multitable
2509
2510 On Linux, it is possible to create a persistent tun/tap interface which will
2511 continue to exist even if tinc quit, although this is normally not required.
2512 It can be useful to set up a tun/tap interface owned by a non-root user, so
2513 tinc can be started without needing any root privileges at all.
2514
2515 @multitable {Darwin (Mac OS X)} {ifconfig route add -bla network address netmask netmask prefixlength interface}
2516 @item Linux
2517 @tab @code{ip tuntap add dev} @var{interface} @code{mode} @var{tun|tap} @code{user} @var{username}
2518 @end multitable
2519
2520 @c ==================================================================
2521 @node    Routes
2522 @section Routes
2523
2524 In some cases it might be necessary to add more routes to the virtual network
2525 interface.  There are two ways to indicate which interface a packet should go
2526 to, one is to use the name of the interface itself, another way is to specify
2527 the (local) address that is assigned to that interface (@var{local_address}). The
2528 former way is unambiguous and therefore preferable, but not all platforms
2529 support this.
2530
2531 Adding routes to IPv4 subnets:
2532
2533 @multitable {Darwin (Mac OS X)} {ifconfig route add -bla network address netmask netmask prefixlength interface}
2534 @item Linux
2535 @tab @code{route add -net} @var{network_address} @code{netmask} @var{netmask} @var{interface}
2536 @item Linux iproute2
2537 @tab @code{ip route add} @var{network_address}@code{/}@var{prefixlength} @code{dev} @var{interface}
2538 @item FreeBSD
2539 @tab @code{route add} @var{network_address}@code{/}@var{prefixlength} @var{local_address}
2540 @item OpenBSD
2541 @tab @code{route add} @var{network_address}@code{/}@var{prefixlength} @var{local_address}
2542 @item NetBSD
2543 @tab @code{route add} @var{network_address}@code{/}@var{prefixlength} @var{local_address}
2544 @item Solaris
2545 @tab @code{route add} @var{network_address}@code{/}@var{prefixlength} @var{local_address} @code{-interface}
2546 @item Darwin (Mac OS X)
2547 @tab @code{route add} @var{network_address}@code{/}@var{prefixlength} @code{-interface} @var{interface}
2548 @item Windows
2549 @tab @code{netsh routing ip add persistentroute} @var{network_address} @var{netmask} @var{interface} @var{local_address}
2550 @end multitable
2551
2552 Adding routes to IPv6 subnets:
2553
2554 @multitable {Darwin (Mac OS X)} {ifconfig route add -bla network address netmask netmask prefixlength interface}
2555 @item Linux
2556 @tab @code{route add -A inet6} @var{network_address}@code{/}@var{prefixlength} @var{interface}
2557 @item Linux iproute2
2558 @tab @code{ip route add} @var{network_address}@code{/}@var{prefixlength} @code{dev} @var{interface}
2559 @item FreeBSD
2560 @tab @code{route add -inet6} @var{network_address}@code{/}@var{prefixlength} @var{local_address}
2561 @item OpenBSD
2562 @tab @code{route add -inet6} @var{network_address} @var{local_address} @code{-prefixlen} @var{prefixlength}
2563 @item NetBSD
2564 @tab @code{route add -inet6} @var{network_address} @var{local_address} @code{-prefixlen} @var{prefixlength}
2565 @item Solaris
2566 @tab @code{route add -inet6} @var{network_address}@code{/}@var{prefixlength} @var{local_address} @code{-interface}
2567 @item Darwin (Mac OS X)
2568 @tab @code{route add -inet6} @var{network_address}@code{/}@var{prefixlength} @code{-interface} @var{interface}
2569 @item Windows
2570 @tab @code{netsh interface ipv6 add route} @var{network address}/@var{prefixlength} @var{interface}
2571 @end multitable
2572
2573 @c ==================================================================
2574 @node    Automatically starting tinc
2575 @section Automatically starting tinc
2576
2577 @menu
2578 * Linux::
2579 * Windows::
2580 * Other platforms::
2581 @end menu
2582
2583 @c ==================================================================
2584 @node       Linux
2585 @subsection Linux
2586
2587 @cindex systemd
2588 There are many Linux distributions, and historically, many of them had their
2589 own way of starting programs at boot time. Today, a number of major Linux
2590 distributions have chosen to use systemd as their init system. Tinc ships with
2591 systemd service files that allow you to start and stop tinc using systemd.
2592 There are two service files: @code{tinc.service} is used to globally enable or
2593 disable all tinc daemons managed by systemd, and
2594 @code{tinc@@@var{netname}.service} is used to enable or disable specific tinc
2595 daemons. So if one has created a tinc network with netname @code{foo}, then
2596 you have to run the following two commands to ensure it is started at boot
2597 time:
2598
2599 @example
2600 systemctl enable tinc
2601 systemctl enable tinc@@foo
2602 @end example
2603
2604 To start the tinc daemon immediately if it wasn't already running, use the
2605 following command:
2606
2607 @example
2608 systemctl start tinc@@foo
2609 @end example
2610
2611 You can also use @samp{systemctl start tinc}, this will start all tinc daemons
2612 that are enabled. You can stop and disable tinc networks in the same way.
2613
2614 If your system is not using systemd, then you have to look up your
2615 distribution's way of starting tinc at boot time.
2616
2617 @c ==================================================================
2618 @node       Windows
2619 @subsection Windows
2620
2621 On Windows, if tinc is started without the @code{-D} or @code{--no-detach}
2622 option, it will automatically register itself as a service that is started at
2623 boot time. When tinc is stopped using the @code{-k} or @code{--kill}, it will
2624 also automatically unregister itself. Once tinc is registered as a service, it
2625 is also possible to stop and start tinc using the Windows Services Manager.
2626
2627 @c ==================================================================
2628 @node       Other platforms
2629 @subsection Other platforms
2630
2631 On platforms other than the ones mentioned in the earlier sections, you have to
2632 look up your platform's way of starting programs at boot time.
2633
2634 @c ==================================================================
2635 @node    About us
2636 @chapter About us
2637
2638
2639 @menu
2640 * Contact information::
2641 * Authors::
2642 @end menu
2643
2644
2645 @c ==================================================================
2646 @node    Contact information
2647 @section Contact information
2648
2649 @cindex website
2650 Tinc's website is at @url{https://www.tinc-vpn.org/},
2651 this server is located in the Netherlands.
2652
2653 @cindex IRC
2654 We have an IRC channel on the FreeNode and OFTC IRC networks. Connect to
2655 @uref{https://freenode.net/, irc.freenode.net}
2656 or
2657 @uref{https://www.oftc.net/, irc.oftc.net}
2658 and join channel #tinc.
2659
2660
2661 @c ==================================================================
2662 @node    Authors
2663 @section Authors
2664
2665 @table @asis
2666 @item Ivo Timmermans (zarq)
2667 @item Guus Sliepen (guus) (@email{guus@@tinc-vpn.org})
2668 @end table
2669
2670 We have received a lot of valuable input from users.  With their help,
2671 tinc has become the flexible and robust tool that it is today.  We have
2672 composed a list of contributions, in the file called @file{THANKS} in
2673 the source distribution.
2674
2675
2676 @c ==================================================================
2677 @node    Concept Index
2678 @unnumbered Concept Index
2679
2680 @c ==================================================================
2681 @printindex cp
2682
2683
2684 @c ==================================================================
2685 @contents
2686 @bye